Busy Year for JFSE in Asia Pacific

first_imgJames Fisher Subsea Excavation (JFSE) said it has provided 200 days of operational expertise in the  region to date in 2019.The projects have included several work scopes for Woen Jinn Harbor Engineering (WJH) at offshore windfarm sites in Taiwan.JFSE’s Twin R2000 spread has been mobilised for more than 300 days in the past two years, supporting WJH’s efforts on major Taiwanese energy projects.Bruce Lee, director at WJH, said: “JFSE has become a trusted partner in our work. We have a very collaborative relationship developing solutions which streamline the excavation element of our projects.”These projects have included trenching and deburying cables at Formosa 1, near Miaoli on the west coast of Taiwan – a 130MW windfarm that is the country’s first commercial-scale offshore wind project.Elsewhere in the Asia Pacific region, JFSE’s SP6000 and LARS system has provided trench maintenance and remedial post trenching services at a remote site in Papua, Indonesia as part of a major project to increase the total capacity at a gas liquefaction plant. The team recently returned to the site and is currently providing operational supporting to assist the client with another work scope.JFSE’s T8000 is preparing three areas of seabed for jacket leg installation in Malaysia and will soon be mobilising to assist with a pipeline repair project elsewhere in the region.More than 200 operational days in Asia Pacific are already contracted for the remainder of 2019 across a number of project sites.Richard Beattie, regional director at JFSE said:“The Asia Pacific market is enjoying a strong period with the extension of oil and gas sites and the growth of the renewables industry. We have been working in this region for many years and have tools based in multiple strategic locations so are well-placed to respond to the needs of new and existing clients.”last_img read more

Worker Safety in Grain Facilities

first_imgINDIANAPOLIS — As local farm workers prepare for this year’s harvest, the Indiana Department of Labor reminds employers and employees about grain handling facility hazards and how to prevent occupational injuries and fatalities.On July 10, 2014 a 9-year-old boy died after falling into a grain bin in Lancaster, Wis., underscoring the dangerous conditions of grain facilities. In June 2013 a Hoosier farm worker in LaPorte County was killed in a grain bin accident.Grain bins across the U.S. have killed more than 180 people and injured more than 675 since 1980. Grain dust is highly flammable and is the number one cause of grain bin explosions.“The safety of our farm workers is of paramount importance to our Indiana agriculture industry,” said Commissioner Rick J. Ruble. “Grain handling facilities are extremely dangerous, and workers must recognize the dangers and take all necessary precautions.”Employees working in or near grain handling facilities should never work alone because they are exposed to significant occupational safety and health hazards including falls, electrocution, engulfment, auger entanglement and dust explosions. Working with a partner ensures help is always nearby.Additionally, employers and employees can reduce the likelihood of worker injury, illness or death by taking the following precautions:Prevent falls: Provide all employees with a body harness and lifeline, or a boatswains chair, and ensure it is properly secured before entering a grain bin. Prevent dust explosions: Prior to entry, test the air within a bin or silo for the presence of combustible and toxic gases and make sure there is sufficient oxygen for safe entry.Employers and employees are strongly encouraged to learn about safe grain handling procedures and take the necessary precautions. To learn more about safe grain handling practices click here. Prevent electrocution and auger entanglement: Before grain bin or silo entry, shut down and lock out all equipment power sources. Station an observer outside the bin or silo to continuously monitor and track the employee inside the bin.center_img Prevent engulfment: Prohibit employees from walking-down the grain or using similar practices to make the grain flow. Prohibit entry into bins or silos underneath a bridging condition or where there is a build-up of grain products on side walls that could shift and bury a worker.last_img read more