September opening for Kato Secondary School – Minister

first_imgThree years after its completion, the Kato Secondary School in Region Eight (Potaro-Siparuni), will finally open its doors to accommodate students at the beginning of the Christmas School Term according to Education Minister Nicolette Henry.Minister Henry visited the school on Thursday along with Social Cohesion Minister, Dr George Norton. Also accompanying the Ministers were senior officers within the Education Ministry; representatives from the Public Infrastructure Ministry; the Guyana Audit Office; Kares Engineering, the firm contracted to build the school; Vikab Guyana Limited, the consultancy firm that overlooked the completion of the remedial works to the building; the Regional Education Office; and the Regional Democratic Council.Education Minister Nicolette Henry inspecting the school’s planThe high-level team toured the entire school complex and inspected the state of readiness and to highlight what additional works need to be done in order to ensure that the school is ready for a September 2018 opening.Particular emphasis was placed on the school’s dormitory, which in the past was flagged for having a number of structural defects. However, with the remedial works being completed, those pressing issues have been solved.Henry further stated that the visit allowed her the opportunity to recognise some of the areas that may not have been given attention, which from a policy directive, ought to have been considered.“We have to ensure that Information Technology (IT) is paramount in terms of smart classrooms, ebooks and IT labs and the configuration of the Science labs and the Home Economics building,” Minister Henry said.Meanwhile, Minister Norton said it is important that the school is completed while assuring Toshao Clifton Perreira that Government will do everything possible to achieve the promised September opening.The Kato Secondary School was completed three years ago but was never commissioned since investigations revealed a number of structural defects, which needed to be remedied before students and teachers could occupy the building.last_img read more

New cracks develop in California’s egg production

first_imgFRESNO – Karen Courtemanche might be getting new neighbors, and she hears their stench is unbearable. Courtemanche lives a mile and a half from the site of a proposed 900,000-chicken farm, but she and other residents aren’t putting out any welcome mats. “I’m sorry, we just don’t want them here,” said Courtemanche, who lives in Lathrop, a city of about 15,000 some 60 miles south of Sacramento. As California’s agricultural heartland becomes increasingly suburban, the state’s egg production has fallen to its lowest level in 50 years. Residents like Courtemanche – as well as developers of a nearby 11,000-home subdivision under construction – don’t want the stench of egg farms near their homes. Until 1991, California was an egg exporter but now brings in eggs from other states to meet demand, Kuney said. 160Want local news?Sign up for the Localist and stay informed Something went wrong. Please try again.subscribeCongratulations! You’re all set! The higher costs associated with consumer pressure for more humane, cage-free eggs is another factor, experts say. “The state has grown and grown, and urban encroachment is something that significantly impacts any farmer,” said Doug Kuney, a poultry expert with the University of California, Riverside. “As the farmer fights off development, development fights off animal agriculture and all that comes with it.” The number of chickens in California fell to 19.2 million last year, down from nearly 40 million birds in the 1970s, when egg production reached highs of more than 8.5 billion eggs. The state failed to reach the 5 billion egg mark last year for the first time since 1959, according to the U.S. Department of Agriculture. In fact, Iowa, Ohio, Indiana and Pennsylvania have all passed California, once No. 1 in the U.S. last_img read more