Women with multiple partners more likely to experience stress and depression

first_imgChild & Family blog.com May 2016Family First Comment:  “Mothers with children conceived by multiple partners were more likely to be depressed both around the birth of the child and two years later…“Depression around the birth of the child correlated with the degree of involvement of the biological father.Women with children by multiple partners are more likely to experience stress and depression compared with mothers whose children share the same father.Paula Fomby at the University of Michigan looked at 3,366 families included in the Fragile Families Child and Wellbeing Study. The families included children who were born between 1998 and 2000 in a number of US cities.Fomby compared mothers who went on to have another child by a new partner within the next three years with mothers who had another child with the same partner or who had no further children.Mothers with multiple partners were likely to receive less social support and less child support from the biological father. Children were likely to have less contact with their biological fathers, and the relationship between the mother and the biological fathers was likely to be poorer.Mothers with children conceived by multiple partners were more likely to be depressed both around the birth of the child and two years later. A mother of a three-year-old with another child by a different partner was 43% more likely to have had a major depressive episode in the past year compared to women who had no further children.Fomby found that depression around the birth of the child correlated with the degree of involvement of the biological father. Two years later, the main correlation was with what Fomby calls “boundary ambiguity” in the family, such as the presence of the new partner’s earlier children in the household and family activities involving both biological and step-father at the same time.READ MORE: https://childandfamilyblog.com/women-multiple-partners/last_img read more

Trap convinced by Dunne and McClean

first_imgGiovanni Trapattoni has put his faith in Richard Dunne and James McClean as his reign as Ireland boss approaches a defining moment. Anthony Pilkington had been tipped to make a debut on the left, while striker Simon Cox was considered as an option, but it was 24-year-old McClean, discarded by Sunderland over the summer, who eventually got the nod after impressing in the corresponding fixture in Stockholm, a 0-0 draw in March. Trapattoni said: “He played well, he is also physically strong and this game is a tough game – it will be a technical, but also a physical game against Sweden. They are strong physically. “At first, I thought about playing with four strikers, but then I thought three strikers is already enough, and because also during the game the other options could be very important. “During the game, I can also choose to have other tactical opportunities. That is the reason.” Dunne’s return will add experience and know-how to a defence which has repeatedly laid the foundation for Ireland’s better results under Trapattoni. The manager still needed assurances over the decision to select a man who because of injury played only 25 minutes of football last season – and that came in June. Discussing Dunne, now at QPR, Trapattoni said: “I said at the last conference, I have to think very well about Richard because firstly, it was a long injury and secondly, he was without a club. “I said also I would follow him because his fitness would be important, and I have seen him very well with the same personality. Press Association The 74-year-old Italian had indicated earlier this week that 33-year-old stalwart Dunne would return to the heart of his defence for Friday night’s World Cup qualifier against Sweden for the first time in a competitive game since the Euro 2012 finals. But he sprang a surprise when he named his starting XI and included Wigan winger McClean in it as the injured Aiden McGeady’s replacement. “I have seen him play very well in games and for me, he is the same Richard as he was before the injury.” Skipper Robbie Keane, who has spent much of his international career at the opposite end of the pitch to his fellow Dubliner, was delighted to see him back in harness. Keane said: “He’s a massive presence. He’s my mate and I know how frustrating it has been for him for such a long time, to be out since the Euros, basically. “I know how excited he is now to be back in the fold and desperate to play in a competitive game. “He’s had a good start to his new team with QPR, so he feels fit and he feels sharp. He’s a massive, massive player for us. “He has a massive presence when he plays for us and any player who comes up against Richard Dunne knows that they are in for a tough night.” Sweden’s visit to the Aviva Stadium and the trip to Austria which follows four days later will go a long way towards deciding the destiny of Ireland’s qualification hopes, and perhaps Trapattoni’s continued presence in his job. However, it is a challenge the veteran manager is relishing. He said: “We are very conscious that in the next two games against Sweden and Austria, we are playing for our participation in the World Cup. “I have watched the [last] match against Sweden and I am convinced that we have a good chance to win this game, because in Stockholm we played very well. “Now we need to repeat the same performance with full commitment. Only with this can we think about achieving qualification, because after the game against Austria we can have greater morale.” last_img read more

Big Ten powerhouses try to put losses behind them

first_imgJAY LAPRETE/Associated PressThe Big Ten’s hope of placing a team in the national championship game took a huge hit when the conference’s top three teams, Ohio State, Michigan and Iowa, all lost this past Saturday.While some college football analysts and writers have already written off the Big Ten, most coaches have yet to hit the panic button.”I don’t think any team is out of anything unless you have two losses,” Michigan head coach Lloyd Carr said.Wisconsin’s Barry Alvarez isn’t worried about the Big Ten yet either.”It’s very, very early to make those kinds of statements,” he said. “The voters recognize the best teams at the end of the year.”It will be a tough road for any of those three teams to make it to the championship game, judging from last year, when Auburn finished undefeated and was left out of the Orange Bowl. Furthermore, all three teams will also have to face each other before the end of the season.Iowa head coach Kirk Ferentz doesn’t like to talk about the BCS at any point of the season, but especially not this early.”I never worry about the BCS and I hope our players don’t either,” Ferentz said.Many of the Big Ten coaches echoed Ferentz’s comments, saying they let other people worry about the race for the National Championship and simply concentrate on winning the games in front of them.”There’s a lot more people outside of this building that talk about it than inside our building,” Ohio State head coach Jim Tressel said. “Right now you can’t worry about what will go on at the end of the year.”Big Ten elite look to bounce back: Last weekend’s losses have left Ohio State, Michigan, and Iowa in the unfamiliar position of having to recover from an early season loss.”You win, you lose, you still have to move on to your next opponent,” Ferentz said. “The worst thing you can do is let the loss carry over to the next game.”Carr said the key is to forget about last week’s game.”The most important thing is to stay focused and be ready to play,” Carr said. “You can’t sit around and feel sorry for yourself because no one else will.”Tressel said his team simply needs to get back to winning games, but with the structure of the college football season, needs to do so quickly.”This isn’t baseball,” Tressel said. “We only get a certain amount of opportunities.”Wildcats claim two Big Ten honors: The Northwestern Wildcats, off to a 2-0 start this season, claimed the offensive and co-special teams players of the week after defeating Northern Illinois last weekend.True freshman running back Tyrell Sutton was named offensive player of the week after rushing for 214 yards and four touchdowns, including the game-winning score.Junior defensive back Marquice Cole earned co-special teams honors after returning two punts for 101 yards, including an 81-yard touchdown scamper.Ohio State linebacker A.J. Hawk was named defensive player of the week for his work in the Buckeyes’ loss to No. 2 Texas. Hawk had 12 tackles, two sacks, an interception, a forced fumble and a fumble recovery.Wisconsin senior wide receiver Brandon Williams shared the co-special teams honors with Cole following the Badgers’ 65-0 blowout win over Temple. Williams returned one kickoff for 38 yards, and four punts for 105 yards, including a 66-yard touchdown.last_img read more

Daisuke Matsuzaka sidelined again after pitching arm reportedly damaged by fan

first_imgInjuries kept Daisuke Matsuzaka from being a star in the major leagues. Now a journeyman in his native Japan, the right-hander is out of action again after a bizarre incident.The Associated Press reported this week that Matsuzaka, 38, was shut down by his current team, the Chunichi Dragons, after an “overzealous admirer” yanked his pitching arm while pursuing an autograph at a team event in Okinawa. The Dragons say Matsuzaka is dealing with shoulder pain and inflammation in the arm. Elbow injuries led to Tommy John surgery in mid-2011. Matsuzaka pitched in parts of three seasons in the majors (2012-14) after the procedure but could not get regular work until he became a swingman for the Mets in 2014.”Dice-K” did not pitch in 2015 or 2017 and threw just 21 innings total in 2016, counting a winter ball stint in Puerto Rico. He finally came back to make 11 starts (55 1/3 innings) for Chunichi last season, earning Comeback Player of the Year honors in the process.Now the comeback is on hold, and maybe over, depending on the severity of the injury. The fact Matsuzaka is still pitching may surprise observers who thought he was destined for a shortened career after being used heavily during his prep career in Japan.He was mostly healthy his first two MLB seasons after signing a six-year, $52 million free-agent contract with the Red Sox in the 2006 offseason. He made 32 starts in 2007 and 29 in 2008 for Boston. He would not make more than 25 starts in a season after that.MORE: Yankees’ Tanaka doesn’t want universal DH even after injurylast_img read more