The Magic Kingdom of Wilderness

first_img“When are you going to take your family to Disney World?”Every fall, my cousin and I watch football games in his “man cave” equipped with sports memorabilia, X-Box, a fully stocked bar and the crown jewel, an HD 70-inch television. As a lifelong Southerner who loves college football, this is nirvana.And for about six years, my cousin pops the Disney question.You see, I have a 10-year-old daughter who has never been to Disney World.The window is closing fast.A year or two ago, American Girl dolls traveled with us everywhere. Planning for a trip to the grandparents in Chattanooga was like organizing a bus load of tourists. In our case, dolls and stuffed animals.These days, fewer and fewer American Girls dolls are joining us, and my cousin, who has an older daughter, has warned me that the Disney princesses are not going to be as appealing come this fall and spring.I have nothing against Disney World or princesses, but this past summer my family decided to do something different. We celebrated the 50th Anniversary of the Wilderness Act by visiting the Citico Creek Wilderness area in the Cherokee National Forest, near Tellico Plains, Tennessee.We literally traded castles and mouse ears for waterfalls and salamanders.We hiked into the Citico Creek Wilderness ending up at Falls Branch Falls, a spectacular roaring 70-foot waterfall. Nurse logs, moss, mushrooms and wildflowers abound. We also snorkeled in the wilderness-fed, Citico Creek, donning wetsuits, floating and exploring for hours in a rushing three-foot clean and clear stream. I will never forget the moment my daughter grabbed my hand when she saw her first colorful darter—a moment of joy and discovery we would experience a hundred times that morning and afternoon.For my entire family, the wilderness became our Magic Kingdom.Disney World in Florida and the Wilderness Act are about the same age. The Wilderness Act passed in 1964; after several years of development, Disney World opened in 1971.Both are uniquely American.We all know the story of Disney, but many of us do not know America’s wilderness story.Fifty years ago this year, Congress passed and President Lyndon Johnson signed into law The Wilderness Act of 1964. The Act established the National Wilderness Preservation System and allowed Congress to permanently protect some of America’s most special and beautiful places as wilderness.Today there are 757 distinct wilderness areas located in 44 states and Puerto Rico, designated to preserve and protect wildlife and natural systems for hiking, camping, backpacking, picnicking, rock climbing, hunting, fishing, kayaking and nature photography. These special places provide us clean air to breathe and clean water to drink.Big Frog and Little Frog, Linville Gorge, Shining Rock, Cohutta, Sipsey, and Shenandoah—these are the special names of just a few of our southern wildernesses.And there is one key difference between Disney World and these wilderness areas. Disney is owned by shareholders and is a multinational corporation. We—all Americans—own the wilderness areas.It’s all public land. It is our treasure. Our inheritance. We all have a stake in it. We are responsible for it, and future generations are counting on us to pass it down protected and preserved.In the age of Facebook and social media, my cousin has seen pictures posted of my daughter standing beside waterfalls, big trees and in a wetsuit. He hasn’t mentioned Disney this fall in the “man cave.” But we have talked about our Magic Kingdom–America’s wilderness.In fact, I’ve been asking him, “When are you going to take your family to the wilderness?”—Pat Byington is Executive Director of Wild South (wildsouth.org)last_img read more

3 money-smart skills you should teach your child earlier than you might think

first_img*Foundations of Financial Well-Being: Insights into the Role of Executive Function, Financial Socialization, and Experience-Based Learning in Childhood and Youth by ANITA I. DREVER, ELIZABETH ODDERS-WHITE, CHARLES W.KALISH, NICOLE M. ELSE-QUEST, EMILY M. HOAGLAND, AND EMORY N. NELMS** Learning Your Monetary ABCs: The Link between Emergent Literacy and Early Childhood Financial Literacy by Martha H. McCormick and David Godsted***Wikipedia (https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Stanford_marshmallow_experiment) Start financial literacy lessons early — and I don’t mean as a Freshman in high school.“Parents’ influence on their children’s understanding of money management begins early…before they even start school.”*If you’re a parent, your child will invariably show interest in money before you drop them off for their first day of kindergarten. Your kids will undoubtedly be exposed to messages to consume by the time they’re two. This is why I’ve spent the better part of my parental experience advocating that parents begin money-smart lessons as early as possible, even as kids are toddling through the house. Research supports what we do: “the early elementary grades may be a developmentally appropriate time to teach children to resist consumer culture.”* Though toddlers are not developmentally able to fully grasp these concepts, they are being exposed to consumer messages and that means that we must expose them to meaningful, balanced counter-messaging. Think of it as “emergent financial literacy.”**Three basic money-smart skills that will set your kids on the path to a smarter financial future are:Making Smart Money Choices.“We are happy with things, until we find out there are better things available.” –Happy Money: The Science of Smarter Spending by Elizabeth Dunn, Michael NortonMaking choices is at the heart of our experience with money. We are always making money choices as adults. It’s important that we allow our kids to do the same – with parental guidance. The best way to teach and reinforce these lessons is through actual experience with cold, hard cash. Providing your kids with a structured allowance is a very effective way to accomplish this goal. Although some would cynically label an allowance as a “handout,” when given for the purpose of teaching your kids how to use money properly, it is a noble endeavor.My parents are wonderful people. Like other parents at the time, they gave us money, called it “allowance” and hoped it might help teach us to become money-smart. Given the limited discourse on youth financial literacy at that time, their approach was actually relatively progressive.We need to do better today, however.Don’t give your kids a handout. Be explicit with them about the meaning of an allowance. Just as you wouldn’t allow them to use a saw or razor without guidance, let them know you are providing an allowance so they may learn to use money properly.A good starting point is to provide your five-year-old with five dollars a week, increasing it from there as your child hits each birthday. I’ve written extensively on allowance and growing financial responsibility with your kids as they age. You can read more in this post, which provides practical allowance tips for kids age two to 12.“For there is nothing either good or bad, but thinking makes it so.”–Stumbling on Happiness by Dan Gilbert.My daughters like to ask me about the quality of their spending decisions. Just last week, my teenage daughter talked to me about her desire to buy a Fjallraven Kanken Mini Backpack, which are apparently all the rage. They cost $60 and she could afford to buy one using some of the money she earned earlier in the summer. I shared my thoughts, “You already have two backpacks. Why do you need another?” In a moment of rare thoughtful attention, I told her to keep in mind that my opinion was just that – mine. My value judgements come from oodles of experience (good and bad). We parents want to share our values. Of course, we’d like our kids to adopt our most cherished ones. But our value judgments are not theirs. Giving our kids responsibility over their own money allows them to learn to make their own judgments when the stakes are low and when those same financial mistakes aren’t potentially catastrophic.Personal experience is the best teacher. Setting up a guided allowance will help your kids begin to understand how to make money-smart choices that will work best for them now and in the future.Needs vs. WantsDistinguishing between needs and wants is essential to becoming money-smart. It’s also very important to not fall into the trap of “demonizing” wants. Desire is okay. Even Money Mammals are allowed to want things. However, it’s equally important that kids recognize that the money tap is not endless.For early elementary and even preschool age kids, it’s very easy to play a simple “need vs. want” game at the market. Ask your child to tell you which of the items you’re purchasing are “needs” and which ones are “wants” as you walk around the store. It’s simple and fun and even little kids start to understand these basic concepts very quickly.It’s also a good idea to explain the unseen decisions that you make. Shelter, food and clothing are three obvious needs that are good for your kids to understand. Teach your children the nuance of what I call “conditional needs.” For example, you need a conveyance to get to work. Your options include walking, biking, taking public transportation or driving your car. You can explain to your kids that the latter might be the best choice, because the other options eat into family time.It’s also helpful for kids to understand that your purchase of a $27,000 Prius may seem extravagant to them. They didn’t see that you didn’t buy a $45,000 SUV. They also don’t see the money you save with its superior fuel economy. It’s worth a conversation with them about these choices. Of course, you could make arguments for all these conveyances depending on your location. It’s ultimately up to you and your situation. The point here is that you communicate to your kids the “why” behind the choices you are making (especially the big, invisible ones).Discussing needs and wants pays off. I recall a time when I dropped and shattered my phone. As I quickly cried out my need for a new one, my very proud daughter interjected, with gusto, “You don’t NEED an iPhone, Dad.” Point taken! Once you begin to teach your kids how to be money-smart, they may help keep YOU in line.Saving for a Goal“Delaying consumption does not drive people to unmitigated self-denial. Rather, it drives them to maximize their happiness, whatever form that takes.” –Happy Money: The Science of Smarter Spending by Elizabeth Dunn, Michael NortonSaving for a goal is one of the most powerful skills you can teach your kids. It goes beyond the financial literacy realm. I believe it’s an essential life skill. Life is only truly lived by the dreamers, and dreams are achieved by setting goals.Research strongly supports training kids to focus on goals early. You’ve likely heard about The Marshmallow Test famously implemented by Stanford researcher, Walter Michel. Children were given a choice between one small immediate reward or waiting a short period of time to get double the reward. You may not know that Mr. Michel did a follow up study on some of those same test subjects many years later. The participants who were able to delay gratification “tended to have better life outcomes, as measured by SAT scores, educational attainment, body mass index (BMI), and other life measures.”*** The long term effects of learning to delay gratification are powerful.Brain research also supports this approach:“Executive function of the brain, critical in goal setting and delaying gratification, develops rapidly in the first five years… Research indicates that there are innate individual differences in inhibition that can be influenced during executive function’s rapid development between the ages of 3 and 5… For example, working memory and inhibition together make it possible to keep our savings goals at the front of our mind even while considering a seductive purchase.”*Need a bit more convincing that it’s important to start early?Another study “found that parent and teacher reports of child’s self-control between the ages of 3 and 11 is associated with future savings and investment behavior, home and retirement account ownership, and self-reported money and credit management success.”*Undoubtedly, there is much that is complicated about financial matters. Teaching your kids about money does not have to be. Start with these basics and you’ll be well on your way to raising a money-smart,  “money comfortable” kid. 111SHARESShareShareSharePrintMailGooglePinterestDiggRedditStumbleuponDeliciousBufferTumblr,John Lanza John Lanza is the Chief Mammal of Snigglezoo Entertainment, and Creator of The Money Mammals. John created The Saving Money Is Fun Kids Club for credit unions nationwide and has … Web: www.themoneymammals.com Detailslast_img read more

Hazard, Sanchez Set to Start as Chelsea Host Arsenal in London…

first_imgDespite winning the FA Cup in May, the heat is already being turned up on Wenger after the Gunners suffered two straight league defeats on the road against Liverpool and Stoke. The last time they lost their opening three league away games was in 1954.Chelsea – the Premier League champions – have been ticking over nicely since their opening weekend defeat at home to Burnley. Victories against Tottenham, Everton and Leicester followed which have put Antonio Conte’s men in a strong position going into this intriguing clash.Chelsea midfielder Danny Drinkwater is expected to be out until the October international break. Drinkwater was an unused substitute against his former club Leicester last Saturday and missed the midweek Champions League win over Qarabag with a calf problem which means he could be out for four weeks.Chelsea are likely to rotate their options after making changes for the Qarabag contest, with playmaker Eden Hazard in contention to start for the Blues for the first time this season.Arsenal are likely to recall a host of first-team regulars for the short trip. Wenger made nine alterations for the Europa League win over Cologne but the likes of Petr Cech, Mesut Ozil, Laurent Koscielny and Alexandre Lacazette will all return to the squad at Stamford Bridge.Alexis Sanchez will feature after playing the whole game on Thursday night, where Theo Walcott (calf) hobbled off. Francis Coquelin (hamstring) and Santi Cazorla (ankle) are definitely out.After winning just four of the previous 16, Chelsea have won their last five home Premier League games against Arsenal, since a 3-5 defeat in October 2011. The Gunners haven’t kept a Premier League clean sheet at Stamford Bridge in their last 12 visits there, shipping at least twice in each of the eight.Arsenal have lost their last five away Premier League games versus Chelsea, their joint-longest away losing run in the competition against a single opponent (also 5 in a row vs Man Utd between 2009-2013).Chelsea have scored in 23 successive Premier League games at Stamford Bridge with over half of these (12) seeing them score three or more goals.Arsenal last won a Premier League away game against a side that finished in the top six last season, back in January 2015 (2-0 at Man City) – they’ve since lost eight and drawn five of their 13 matches on the road against these clubs.Share this:FacebookRedditTwitterPrintPinterestEmailWhatsAppSkypeLinkedInTumblrPocketTelegram Chelsea host Arsenal in the first part of Super Sunday today knowing a victory will heap more pressure on Arsene Wenger’s shoulders. Arsenal have not won any of the last 13 Premier League away games against last season’s top-six teams and have suffered defeats on seven of their last eight visits to Stamford Bridge.Wenger last tasted victory on the road against one of the big boys nearly 1000 days ago when they saw off Manchester City 2-0 in 2015.last_img read more

Great Harvest Bread’s Summer Line-up

first_imgSubmitted by Great Harvest Bread CompanyLocally owned and operated Great Harvest Bread Co. has been part of the Olympia community for nearly a year and a half. When the store opened in January 2011, the lineup of offerings was fairly simple, but thanks to suggestions from customers and staff, they’ve added a little something for everyone!Over the past year, the owners, Jim and Kerry Norem, have met an increasing demand for gluten-free items as well as provided organic wheat and sourdough breads, focaccia and a few new sandwiches! Every month, great care and preparation are taken when adding delicious new items to the menu.Let’s take a look at what goes on at Great Harvest, and see what’s in store for June!One of the most exciting new additions to the menu this month has to be the Bacon Cheddar Beer Bread. This is a 100% whole wheat beer bread made with local beer from Fish Brewing Co. and is one of several premium breads offered. Great Harvest is excited to be baking not only mouth-watering Bacon Cheddar Beer hamburger buns for memorable summer barbecues, but they’re making white, whole wheat and Cheddar Garlic hamburger buns too!For those who desire or require gluten-free baked goods, don’t think they’ve forgotten about you! Gluten-free hamburger buns will be available all summer long, made to order in any flour or amount you desire. Aside from buns, the gluten-free options are plentiful – from delicious scones and cookies to hearty Flax Oat Walnut bread that’s great for sandwiches and toast!Another exciting addition to the gluten-free lineup in June will be our Groovy Granola, which has been a favorite since Great Harvest opened, but now they’ll also be making some with no gluten!While Great Harvest will be providing the premium breads and sweets that you’ve come to love since their grand opening, the focus in June is on summer activities. Jim Norem is excited to provide baked goods and sandwiches to the community while ensuring that you get out and do what you really want: enjoy the sun! “We’ve got energy bars for hiking and great box lunches for road trips and picnics so people can take advantage of the beautiful outdoors,” Jim said. He also said that if anyone needs a specialty item or wants to place an order for a special occasion, all they have to do is call!As you know, Washington summers are beyond compare. With so many barbecues, special events and warm days and nights, why not enjoy and share some quality, hand-made baked goods made right here in Olympia with fresh and local ingredients? Great Harvest is looking forward to a fantastic summer filled with friends, good times and great bread! Facebook29Tweet0Pin0last_img read more