Del Bosque: “Sport has empowered Spain”

first_imgThe former soccer selector Vicente del Bosque said this Friday that “sport has empowered Spain” and he praised the behavior that over the years the players who won the World Cup in South Africa have maintained “which has been exemplary and has made children who start in football want to be like them in every way.”“These players have been our heroes and have been able to choose their destiny. Some have extended their trajectory more and others chose to retire, but all of them have had a brilliant career, “said the technician from Salamanca within the framework of the Segovian Sports Gala at the Juan Bravo Theater in Segovia, where Del Bosque received an award at the end of ten years of Spain’s victory in the World Cup. At the Gala, Best Segovian Athlete of 2019 was chosen to the paddler David Llorente, runner-up in the world of eslalon K-1 in the modality of white water, which was imposed in the vote to the marathoner Javi GuerraTo the club of Asobal League of Nava Handball, to futsal players Estela García Y Angel Velasco ‘Lin’to the athlete Agueda Muñoz Marqués and the triathlete Marina Muñoz.The journalist was also awarded Santiago Segurola, who received the ‘Pablo Fierro’ award to the professional career.last_img read more

A gut microbe that stops food allergies

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Required fields are indicated by an asterisk (*) Sign up for our daily newsletter Get more great content like this delivered right to you! Countrycenter_img A class of bacteria commonly found in the guts of people—and rodents—appears to keep mice safe from food allergies, a study suggests. The same bacteria are among those reduced by antibiotic use in early childhood. The research fits neatly into an emerging paradigm that helps explain a recent alarming increase in food allergies and other conditions, such as obesity and autoimmune disease, and hints at strategies to reverse the trend.Food allergies have increased about 50% in children since 1997. There are various theories explaining why. One is that the 21st century lifestyle, which includes a diet very different from our ancestors’, lots of antibiotic use, and even a rise in cesarean section deliveries, has profoundly changed the makeup of microbes in the gut of many people in developed countries. For example, the average child in the United States has taken three courses of antibiotics by the time he or she is 2 years old, says Martin Blaser, an infectious disease specialist and microbiologist at New York University in New York City. (See here for more on the reach of microbiome research these days.)Cathryn Nagler, an immunologist at the University of Chicago in Illinois, has spent years probing links between the immune system, intestinal bacteria, and the onset of allergies. Back in 2004, she and her colleagues reported that wiping out gut bacteria in mice led to food allergies. Since then, Nagler has continued trying to understand which bacteria offer allergy protection and how they accomplish that. In one of the latest efforts, Nagler’s team first confirmed that mice given antibiotics early in life were far more susceptible to peanut sensitization, a model of human peanut allergy. Then, they introduced a solution containing Clostridia, a common class of bacteria that’s naturally found in the mammalian gut, into the rodents’ mouths and stomachs. The animals’ food allergen sensitization disappeared, the team reports online today in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences. When the scientists instead introduced another common kind of healthy bacteria, called Bacteroides, into similarly allergy-prone mice, they didn’t see the same effect. Studying the rodents more carefully, the researchers determined that Clostridia were having a surprising effect on the mouse gut: Acting through certain immune cells, the bacteria helped keep peanut proteins that can cause allergic reactions out of the bloodstream. “The bacteria are maintaining the integrity of the [intestinal] barrier,” Nagler says.The research “opens up new territory,” Blaser says. It “extends the frontier of how the microbiome is involved” in immune responses and the roles played by specific bacteria. (Blaser’s group reported earlier this month in Cell that giving mice penicillin soon after birth changed their gut microbiome and made them much more likely to be obese as adults.) Nagler and her university have filed for a patent application on the new findings. The ultimate goal is to “interrupt [the allergy] process by manipulating the microbiota,” she says—a probiotic consisting of Clostridia could be a new allergy therapy, for example. Nagler knows of none on the market yet, and they would need testing in people before becoming a treatment of choice.last_img read more