Fire crews attend blaze on 100th street – update

first_img* Update: Fire crews have successfully put-out the small blaze at the Pryndik Bit & Supply Store on Friday. Fire Chief Fred Burrows says the fire was likely caused by a spark from the chimney. He says it got caught on the roof, and began burning through fiberglass panel and eventually through some styrofoam on the roof. This caused smoke to fill the building. Chief Burrows says an elderly man was inside when crews arrived, and was trying to put out the fire.   He was treated in an ambulance on-site and released shortly after. Chief Burrows estimates the damage to be around $1,000. =================The Fort St. John Fire Department attended a fire at 8808 100th Street on Friday.Ambulance crews were also on-site.The fire is causing minor delays to vehicles travelling in both directions on 100th street.Advertisement – Advertisement -By Christine Rumleskie More information will be posted as it becomes available.center_img Photo: Fire crews inspect this building on 100th Street on Friday – Christine Rumleskie/Energeticcity.calast_img read more

North West City Region takes the spotlight in Dublin

first_imgCivic leaders from Donegal, Derry and Strabane met with senior government officials in Dublin yesterday to highlight the substantial progress being made in the North West City Region.Representatives of Donegal County Council and Derry City and Strabane District Council attended the meeting at Dublin Castle, which was focused on the achievements in the region’s priorities for growth.The meeting of the North West Strategic Growth Partnership which is made up of senior officials from Government Departments in both the Republic of Ireland and Northern Ireland with a special focus on the Letterkenny, Derry, Strabane City region heard first-hand how the strong collaborative regional approach is driving forward growth and development in this cross-border region. Cathaoirleach of Donegal County Council, Cllr Nicholas Crossan believes that this cross-border regional approach is reaping dividends for the North West City Region saying “the support for the ambitions of the North West City Region is clearly evident among those attending this meeting of the Strategic Growth Partnership.  Having this focus on the North West City Region in Dublin and having senior government officials working in a co-ordinated and concerted way on the region’s priorities is to be welcomed by everyone concerned.  We are only at the beginning of our journey, but already we can see progress being made.”John Kelpie, Chief Executive, Derry City and Strabane District Council, Cllr Nicholas Crossan, Cathaoirleach of Donegal County Council, Joe McHugh TD, Minister for Education and Skills, Cllr. Michaela Boyle, Mayor of Derry City and Strabane District Council and Seamus Neely, Chief Executive, Donegal County Council.Mayor of Derry City and Strabane District Council Cllr. Michaela Boyle acknowledged the support of central governments in both parts of the island for the North West Strategic Growth Partnership saying “we have a long history of cross-border connections in the North West region and to see this approach being formalised and supported by central government is a massive step forward for us in realising our untapped potential as a region.  Aligning our regional strategic priorities with those of central government allows for more targeted economic growth and investment contributing in a positive and meaningful way to social and community cohesion and wellbeing.”Representatives from the Irish Business Employers Confederation, the Confederation of British Industry NI and IBEC/CBI Joint Council presented on how working with business and industry is delivering opportunities for growth in the North West City Region.They spoke about the importance of utilising the opportunities available to strengthen existing partnerships that will allow the Donegal, Derry and Strabane areas to build on their strategic strengths. Members of the North West Strategic Growth Partnership which is made up of senior Government officials from Departments in both the Republic of Ireland and Northern Ireland meeting in Dublin Castle on Wednesday. Picture includes Cathaoirleach of Donegal County Council Cllr Nicholas Crossan, Minister for Education and Skills Joe McHugh TD, Mayor of Derry City and Strabane District Council Cllr. Michaela Boyle and Chief Executives of Donegal County Council and Derry City and Strabane District Council Seamus Neely and John Kelpie.It was suggested the region extend the City Region scope to connect with other hubs such as Galway and Limerick, while ensuring there is a robust and co-ordinated framework that can underpin cross-border public and private investment.The Regional Innovation Partners which include Letterkenny Institute of Technology, Donegal ETB, Ulster University and the North West Regional College working with both Councils outlined details on emerging opportunities to deliver economic growth through regional innovation pathways.Among the ambitious plans are the expansion of the Ulster University Magee Campus, the creation of a UniverCity, and the advancement of key City Deal projects that includes the Medical Entry School and projects relating to personalised medicine, data analytics and advanced robotics to be underpinned by state-of-the-art digital infrastructure.Discussions also took place in relation to the emerging Climate Action and Adaptation policies and how the North West City Region can deliver on national priorities in these emerging areas.Seamus Neely, Chief Executive of Donegal County Council said “we are steadfast in our approach to developing a City region that is thriving, sustainable and prosperous and while challenges remain substantial progress has been made with a number of key strategic infrastructural and regeneration projects underway.” John Kelpie Chief Executive of Derry City and Strabane District Council explained that the North West Region of the Island of Ireland is the fourth largest urban agglomeration on the island and said “the North West Strategic Growth Partnership is proving to be a vital mechanism in enabling the alignment of strategic policy and resource allocation in such a way that allows the region to realise it’s full and considerable potential as a net contributor to the economy North and South and in an East – West context.”North West City Region takes the spotlight in Dublin was last modified: June 20th, 2019 by Rachel McLaughlinShare this:Click to share on Facebook (Opens in new window)Click to share on Twitter (Opens in new window)Click to share on LinkedIn (Opens in new window)Click to share on Reddit (Opens in new window)Click to share on Pocket (Opens in new window)Click to share on Telegram (Opens in new window)Click to share on WhatsApp (Opens in new window)Click to share on Skype (Opens in new window)Click to print (Opens in new window)Tags:Donegal County Councilnorth west city regionlast_img read more

NCS Playoffs: Fortuna boys soccer rolls to opening-round win over Willits

first_imgARCATA >> The Huskies opened postseason play just in the same kind of fashion as they concluded the regular season.And this time, they got to play a playoff game within Humboldt County borders.The Fortuna boys soccer team built an early lead and never looked back, as the fourth-seeded Huskies began the quest to make a second straight North Coast Section Division I championship game with a 10-0 win over No. 13 seed Willits at College Creek Field on Wednesday afternoon.The Huskies, the …last_img read more

#NGODigitalSpaces, NGOs and social media

first_img#NGODigitalSpaces workshops in South Africa taught people in the non-profit sector about using social media to gain the trust of potential donors and supporters. By using the .ngo domain, donors will know that the organisation has been verified.Jeri Curry, Enset CEO, says the non-profit provider is using the #NGODigitalSpaces workshops to teach people in the non-profit sector how they can use digital platforms to gain the trust of potential donors and supporters. (Image: YouTube, Enset.ngo)Melissa JavanSeveral workshops, called #NGODigitalSpaces, were held in South Africa this month to teach people in the non-profit sector about why they should use social media to gain the trust of supporters and donors.Around the world, there are low levels of public trust and individual and institutional donors, both internationally and locally, want more information and reassurances about how funds are used. Social media, the workshops posited, could help to build this trust.What is #NGODigitalSpaces?The #NGODigitalSpaces workshops are hosted by Enset, a non-profit provider. It was set up in 2015 to understand and address the digital needs of global non- profits and to help improve the online effectiveness of non-governmental organisations (NGOs) through education, training and the use of the .ngo domain.Other stakeholders at the #NGODigitalSpaces workshops included international alliance Civicus, the grassroots grantmaker Global Fund for Community Foundations, the freedom of expression and access to information movement Right2Know, and the non-governmental organisation Corruption Watch South Africa.The aim of the workshopsJeri Curry, Enset CEO, said the goal in hosting #NGODigitalSpaces was to bring together civil society to discuss how the .ngo domain, digital efforts and the internet could be used to amplify the voice of a non-profit.Discussions were to help NPOs increase their reach, advance their mission and drive solidarity within the civil society sector for NGOs.“We believe that the internet needs to be open and accessible and that non- profits need to have their ‘digital house in order’ to effectively use the power of the internet for their non-profit,” said Curry.Watch Jeri Curry talk about how people in the non-profit sector can use their voice:The Enset events were held this year in San Paolo, Brazil; Nairobi, Kenya; Bogota, Colombia; and Cape Town and Johannesburg, South Africa. “We are also planning to be part of the Digital Forum at the upcoming IFC (International Fundraising Congress) event hosted by the Resource Alliance in the Netherlands on 20 October,” said Curry.“We work with local partners in each location to reach non-profit organisations in the community to invite them to the events.”Watch Zawadi Nyong’o, a Kenyan social media expert, explain why social media should be used by non-profit organisations:The South African workshops#NGODigitalSpaces were held in the Western Cape and Gauteng, the last one on 7 October 2016 in Johannesburg. Curry said there were many local organisations represented, ranging in size from small community-based to large international NGOs.”There were about 40 people who joined the conversation we held in partnership with Civicus in Johannesburg, 60 who attended the Cape Town Woodstock Enset and 50 who participated in the Bandwidth Barn Khayelitsha digital workshop attended primarily by local community-based non-profits,” she explained.Participants shared their thoughts on Twitter:Kavisha Pillay @Kavs_Pillay speaking of importance of online security, use of encryption and privacy in @Corruption_SA #NGOdigitalspaces— LRC South Africa (@LRC_SouthAfrica) October 7, 2016“Technology is about trying things, falling down and trying again.” @AdiFrost #ngodigitalspaces— shaguftapasta (@shaguftapasta) October 7, 2016It doesn’t take an army to build your digital presence. The content you put out is important. – Jeri Curry/ @enset #NGOdigitalspaces— Bizcommunity.com (@Bizcommunity) October 4, 2016“Digital makes the way you work far more efficient & your communication far more effective.” -Colin Habberton @relatomics #NGOdigitalspaces— Enset (@enset) October 4, 2016Legitimacy through social mediaCurry said that around the world, non-profit sectors were confronted with low levels of public trust. “At the same time, in many countries the space for civic engagement is also shrinking, with increased scrutiny from both individual and institutional donors and regulatory policies that are constantly changing.”Now more than ever, both international and local funders want more information and reassurance as to how funds are used, where they are allocated and the kinds of impacts they are having on the ground,” she said.”As NGOs start to use .ngo there is a movement of solidarity within the sector to protect the civil society digital space.”She believes this is why NPOs should get their digital house in order. “Legitimacy for NGOs is incredibly important for both the stakeholders they serve and for their donors,” she explained.”Donors want to donate to organisations that are transparent and legitimate and by utilising the .ngo domain, donors will know that your organisation has been verified… Credibility with donors and stakeholders is important as the work that NGOs do is serving a community and trust is key to establishing a relationship with that community.”The futureEnset planned to hold four to five sessions globally next year, said Curry. “We are working on the possibility of a virtual event so we can expand our reach and support more NGOs, particularly those in the global south and developing countries.“We are fortunate to have partnerships with many in civil society who have helped us in creating both the content and platforms for the events. As of now we are looking at bringing #NGODigitalSpaces to London, the United Kingdom, the Asia Pacific Region, Latin America, Bangkok, Thailand, and India in 2017.”She added: “We will also be returning to South Africa and Kenya to host future events.”Would you like to use this article in your publication or on your website? See Using Brand South Africa materiallast_img read more

US-Canada Trade Conflicts

first_imgShare Facebook Twitter Google + LinkedIn Pinterest By Chris ClaytonDTN Ag Policy EditorWASHINGTON (DTN) — Canada could announce a new list of retaliatory tariffs on more U.S. goods, including agricultural products, as early as next week. The tariffs would maintain parity with the U.S. over steel and aluminum tariffs the Trump administration imposed against Canada.David MacNaughton, Canada’s ambassador to the U.S., highlighted the tariffs Monday as he spoke to members of the North American Agricultural Journalists at the group’s annual meeting in Washington. MacNaughton said Canadian officials are reconfiguring retaliatory tariffs to keep roughly $15 billion in products from the U.S. under either a 25% or 10% tariff.As a result of some exclusions and modifications, MacNaughton said, Canadian officials “will be refreshing that retaliation list,” likely within the next week, to maintain dollar-for-dollar retaliation.The retaliation will include “a significant number of agricultural products.” Possible new targets for tariffs could be apples, pork, ethanol and wine, he said. Once a list goes out, there will be up to 45 days of consultations to see which products would have the biggest impact on the U.S. and least impact on Canadians.“There are a variety of agricultural products we would look at and see to what degree they would impact Canadian producers and consumers,” MacNaughton said. “But I would think it would be a fairly long list.” He added, “I can’t imagine we wouldn’t at least put those kinds of products on consultation.”The Canadian tariffs are in response to “Section 232” tariffs placed on steel and aluminum imports by the U.S. last year. The Trump administration maintains the tariffs on imported steel and aluminum are needed for national security reasons, but the tariffs also helped force Canada and Mexico to renegotiate the North American Free Trade Agreement, which has become the U.S.-Mexico-Canada Agreement (USMCA). The USMCA still needs ratification by all three countries to go into effect.“On balance, I think the USMCA is a good deal,” MacNaughton said, adding Canadians want to remain a strong partner with the U.S.MacNaughton added that President Donald Trump has a new trade deal “which he indicates is the best trade agreement ever negotiated,” so the need for 232 tariffs should presumably be gone. “That is an important condition for us moving ahead.”Canada’s government is committed to passing the USMCA, but MacNaughton said the 232 tariffs on Canada and Mexico must be removed for the Canadian government to move the USMCA through its parliament. At the moment, MacNaughton said, there are no talks between the countries about dropping the Section 232 tariffs, only a “restating of positions.” Canadian officials argue the 232 tariffs are unjustified and illegal.Some Trump administration officials have talked about setting steel and aluminum quotas for Canada and Mexico, which MacNaughton said would translate into distorting trade. Under exclusions the U.S. has given already, China has more than 20 times the exclusions Canada was granted by the U.S.“When the stated purpose of these tariffs was to curb overproduction by countries like China, I find it difficult to understand why it is being imposed on Canada,” MacNaughton said.For 15 straight years, the U.S. had a surplus with Canada on imports-exports of steel products. MacNaughton noted, with a little irony, that the U.S. trade surplus ended last year when U.S. exports to Canada fell by $800 million. “So my question is, how’s that program working for you so far?”In terms of aluminum, MacNaughton said, at peak capacity, the U.S. aluminum industry can only produce about 25% of its aluminum needs. The question then becomes where does the U.S. want to get its aluminum?“If you put quotas on Canada, it necessitates that imports will come from other places like Russia, China, Kazakhstan, and how does that enhance U.S. national security?” the ambassador said. “So we think steel and aluminum quotas make no sense.”Canada is facing some time constraints on the USMCA, MacNaughton noted. The Canadian Parliament adjourns June 15 to campaign and will not reconvene until after elections in October. MacNaughton said it’s not a good idea to go into the election with the USMCA hanging out there unratified because it would stir the political pot.“If this is unresolved, if the 232 tariffs are still in place, then the discussion about our relationship with the United States of America will be a central part of the campaign, and it won’t be a really positive discussion, I think,” he said.The ambassador added that it’s important for the U.S. and Canada to maintain their geopolitical alliance because Russia is considering establishing military bases in the Arctic. China also continues to bring political pressure against Canada over the arrest of a Huawei executive by Canadian officials at the request of the U.S. China has arrested at least two Canadians as spies and also cut off imports of Canadian canola and petroleum. MacNaughton said it’s important during the U.S.-China talks for U.S. officials to help Canada address these issues, especially the arrests of Canadian citizens.“We face more challenges internationally today than I’ve ever seen in my life,” MacNaughton said. “It’s a time when the word ‘ally’ actually has substantial meaning.”While U.S. officials appear reluctant to deal with the tariffs, MacNaughton added U.S. officials are consistently seeking Canada’s help with Venezuela as well.“It is that kind of thing that is causing a real sort of irritation and befuddlement as to why?” MacNaughton said. “If our two countries can’t get along, what does that say to the rest of the world?”Approval of the USMCA in the U.S. Congress hinges partially on Mexico passing new labor laws that coincide with the trade deal. House Speaker Nancy Pelosi, D-Calif., raised that point last week. MacNaughton said it was part of the agreement that Mexico would update its labor laws.“That was part of the negotiations, and I think an important part of it,” he said.Outside the tariff argument, critics of the USMCA deal don’t think Canada opens up its dairy or poultry markets enough under the new deal. Without an agreement, Canada would keep the Class 6 and Class 7 pricing schemes for milk and maintain the current wheat-grading program that discounts U.S. wheat. Mexico would also maintain substantial wage advantages in automobile manufacturing compared to Canada and the U.S., MacNaughton said.“I don’t think there is any question whatsoever that it (USMCA) is an improvement over the status quo,” he said.Chris Clayton can be reached at Chris.Clayton@dtn.comFollow him on Twitter @ChrisClaytonDTN© Copyright 2019 DTN/The Progressive Farmer. All rights reserved.last_img read more