Cuban says Mavs want Kristaps Porzingis, Luka Doncic for long haul

first_img SEA Games 2019: Philippines clinches historic gold in women’s basketball PLAY LIST 05:02SEA Games 2019: Philippines clinches historic gold in women’s basketball06:27SEA Games 2019: No surprises as Gilas Pilipinas cruises to basketball gold02:43Philippines make clean sweep in Men’s and Women’s 3×3 Basketball02:14Carpio hits red carpet treatment for China Coast Guard02:56NCRPO pledges to donate P3.5 million to victims of Taal eruption00:56Heavy rain brings some relief in Australia02:37Calm moments allow Taal folks some respite03:23Negosyo sa Tagaytay City, bagsak sa pag-aalboroto ng Bulkang Taal01:13Christian Standhardinger wins PBA Best Player award Philippine Army to acquire MANPADS, self-propelled howitzers Japeth Aguilar wins 1st PBA Finals MVP award for Ginebra Miami Heat to retire Chris Bosh’s No. 1 jersey next month Latvian big man Porzingis, the number four pick in the 2015 NBA Draft, hasn’t played since undergoing surgery to repair a torn left knee ligament last February.He was traded from the New York Knicks last week in a blockbuster multi-player deal, but the Mavericks were quick to say that they don’t expect him to resume competition this season.FEATURED STORIESSPORTSGolden State Warriors sign Lee to multiyear contract, bring back ChrissSPORTSCoronation night?SPORTSThirdy Ravena gets‍‍‍ offers from Asia, Australian ball clubsCuban said the Mavericks will evaluate Porzingis and develop a timetable for his return.“I’ve been patient this whole time and I’m going to keep staying patient,” Porzingis said. “We’re going to make the right decisions.” Nadine Lustre’s phone stolen in Brazil LATEST STORIES Gretchen Barretto’s daughter Dominique graduates magna cum laude from California college Phivolcs: Slim probability of Taal Volcano caldera eruption View comments Newly acquired player Kristaps Porzingis, left, responds to questions as head coach Rick Carlisle, center, and team owner Mark Cuban, right, listen during a news conferences where the newly acquired players were introduced in Dallas, Monday, Feb. 4, 2019. (AP Photo/Tony Gutierrez)Kristaps Porzingis won’t join new Dallas teammate Luka Doncic on court this season, but once he does Mavericks owner Mark Cuban wants to keep the duo together for the long haul.“Our goal is to keep these two together for the next 20 years,” Cuban said Monday as the NBA club held a press conference to introduce new acquisitions Porzingis, Tim Hardaway Jr. Courtney Lee and Trey Burke.ADVERTISEMENT While Porzingis can become a restricted free agent at the end of this season, Cuban envisions Porzingis staying in Dallas and forming a dynamic duo with rookie sensation Doncic, the third overall selection in last June’s draft who is averaging 20.7 points per game along with 7.0 rebounds and 5.4 assists.Porzingis, 23, said he had a “great relationship” with the 19-year-old Slovenian, having played against him in Europe.“I remember he was a few years younger than me. We just know each other from playing against each other for a long time,” Porzingis said. “Now that I have the opportunity to play with him I’m really excited about it.”ADVERTISEMENT In fight vs corruption, Duterte now points to Ayala, MVP companies as ‘big fish’ Ginebra beats Meralco again to capture PBA Governors’ Cup title Sports Related Videospowered by AdSparcRead Next Will you be the first P16 Billion Powerball jackpot winner from the Philippines? MOST READ Don’t miss out on the latest news and information. Tom Brady most dominant player in AFC championship historylast_img read more

USDA report mixed

first_imgShare Facebook Twitter Google + LinkedIn Pinterest The USDA report Friday was mixed. Increased U.S. demand for corn and soybeans was supportive. Higher production and higher ending stocks were a negative for wheat. Corn ending stocks were reduced 95 million bushels for old crop, new crop ending stocks went down 145 million bushels. The yield remained the same for new crop at 168 bushels per acre. While the corn numbers could be viewed friendly the market action following the report did very little. Before the report corn was up 1 cent. In the minutes that followed the noon release, corn did manage to be up 10 cents. Those gains were not holding at 12:25 with corn down 4 cents. Soybeans could be considered a touch friendly. However, like corn the early gains did not hold. Before the report soybeans were up 12-14 cents. After the report they did breach the $12 mark on the July CBOT as they reached $12.08. Not holding the $12 would be a negative. Again the soybeans could not hold those gains. On the days’ high they were up 32 cents in the July and up 32 in the November. Soybean ending stocks were lowered in the old crop by 30 million bushels to 370 million bushels. New crop soybean ending stocks came out at 260 million bushels, down 45 million bushels. Soybean production was lowered 2 million tons in Brazil to 97 million tons, no surprise there. Argentina production did not change. That is a small surprise with production pegged at 56.5 million tons. At 12:25 soybeans were down 3 cents for old and up 2 cents for new soybeans.Wheat was considered negative with production above expectations for US wheat. Ending stocks also increased. A 12:25 wheat was down 12 cents. Prior to the report wheat was down 7 cents. July CBOT wheat needs to hold the $5 level if it is going to push through the strong resistance at $5.30 to $5.34.Today’s USDA report contains a multitude of numbers for corn, soybeans, and wheat. Numbers for the US and the rest of the world were released. With those numbers there is always a bias of which might be more important as well as the ones to ignore. Bottom line, while they provide fodder for market direction one item remains top in the minds of producers, traders, and market watchers. It boils down to weather. Now the weather to watch is in the U.S. growing regions, specifically the Midwest. While you may have been surprised this past month with the strength and depth of the current rally, this thought remains. For a moment, take everything you have seen with prices through Friday, June 3. Price activity up to that date had nothing to do with U.S. weather. It was dependent on South America weather and demand. Just this week, U.S. weather has become a dominant feature for grain prices. In coming weeks and through July and August you will be hearing much about U.S. weather. You are about to be bombarded with a legion of forecasts. Typically there will be a morning, noon, and overnight forecast. Now throw in the US and European models. That means in the passing of 24 hours there could be six different forecasts. Adding to the forecast fury is the reality of many different weather forecasters, each with their own slant to what is about to happen. If your head is about to explode you are not on an island. I was reminded this week that the European model is typically more accurate in dry conditions. Adding even more to the slurry of confusion surrounding weather reports is this typical comparison in the summer: How does the American model compare to the European model? Now once you throw all of these reports into the blender and what do you get? The reality that the forecasts are just that, forecasts. How quickly they change. Turn the calendar back to the summer of 2012 and the drought that affected many Ohio producers. Rain was coming – it was just two days away. And when those two days are now today, it was as dry as a bone. But rain is still coming in just two days. Then the frustration sets when it remains dry week after week.If the last month was a blur to you with all of the planting, spraying, and fieldwork taking place you are not alone. With the May 10 USDA supply and demand report, July CBOT corn closed at $3.18, up 10 ¾ cents. Last night July corn was $4.26 ½. On that same May 10 date, December CBOT corn was $3.87 ¾. Last night it was $4.33 ½. November CBOT soybeans on May 10 were $10.76, up 57 cents that day. Last night they closed at $11.52 ¾. In case you thought we are seeing a bull market for soybeans, you are correct. Reuters reports that soybeans are poised to close higher for the 9th week in a row. This is the longest bullish stretch in 43 years. The “dome of doom” forecast was less than three months ago. At that time corn below $3 and soybeans near $7 seemed a real possibility according to some market watchers.Midwest rains next week should be resistance for higher corn and soybean prices. Higher demand will be supportive for corn and soybeans. Next week we will see what wins — weather or demand.last_img read more

When Sunshine Drives Moisture Into Walls

first_img Sign up for a free trial and get instant access to this article as well as GBA’s complete library of premium articles and construction details. This article is only available to GBA Prime Members Builders have worried about wintertime vapor diffusion ever since 1938, when Tyler Stewart Rogers published an influential article on condensation in the Architectural Record. Rogers’ article, “Preventing Condensation in Insulated Structures,” included this advice: “A vapor barrier undoubtedly should be employed on the warm side of any insulation as the first step in minimizing condensation.”Rogers’ recommendation, which was eventually incorporated into most model building codes, was established dogma for over 40 years. Eventually, though, building scientists discovered that interior vapor barriers were causing more problems than they were solving.Interior vapor barriers are rarely necessary, since wintertime vapor diffusion rarely leads to problems in walls or ceilings. A different phenomenon — summertime vapor diffusion — turns out to be a far more serious matter.During the 1990s, summertime vapor diffusion began to wreak havoc with hundreds of North American homes. This epidemic in rotting walls was brought on by two changes in building practice: The first was the widespread adoption of air conditioning, while the second was one unleashed by Rogers himself: the use of interior polyethylene vapor barriers.Rogers conceived of interior vapor barriers as a defense against the diffusion of water vapor from the interior of a home into cold wall cavities. Rogers failed to foresee that these vapor barriers would eventually be cooled by air conditioning — thereby turning into condensing surfaces that began dripping water into walls during the summer.As with many scientific discoveries, it took a series of disasters to fully illuminate the phenomenon of summertime vapor diffusion.One early victim of this type of diffusion was Cincinnati builder Zaring Homes. In the mid-1990s, Zaring Homes was a thriving mid-size builder that completed over 1,500 new homes a year. But the company’s expansion plans came to a screeching halt in 1999 when dozens of its new homes developed… center_img Start Free Trial Already a member? Log inlast_img read more