New anthrax antidote performs well in animals

first_img Rai P, Padala C, Poon V, et al. Statistical pattern matching facilitates the design of polyvalent inhibitors of anthrax and cholera toxins. Nature Biotech 2006 Apr 23 (early online publication) [Full text] Apr 24 NIH news releasehttp://www.niaid.nih.gov/news/newsreleases/2006/Pages/AMD_06.aspx In test-tube experiments, the antitoxin was 10,000 times more potent than single peptides, the NIH said. The NIH-supported research was done by a team led by Ravi S. Kane, PhD, of Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute in Troy, N.Y., and Jeremy Mogridge, PhD, of the University of Toronto. Their report was published Apr 23 in Nature Biotechnology. See also: The PA molecule has a number of sites that can bind to host cells, the NIH said. Therefore, Kane and colleagues created a molecule that can cling to PA at multiple sites. The protein-studded bubble they produced is called a peptide-functionalized liposome. “Just as a glove matches the shape of a hand more closely than a mitten, and so fits more snugly, the polyvalent inhibitor binds the toxin at multiple sites and is orders of magnitude more potent than an inhibitor that binds at a single site,” the agency said. “The multiple peptides on the functionalized liposome are arranged with the same average spacing as the binding sites of the PA molecule, which permits a firmer bond between the two, explains Dr Kane.” The researchers created a fatty bubble, studded with proteins, that binds to a key component of anthrax toxin at multiple sites, preventing it from attaching to host cells, the National Institutes of Health (NIH) said in a news release.center_img “This novel approach to the design of anthrax antitoxin is an important advance, not only for the value it may have in anthrax treatment, but also because this technique could be used to design better therapies for cholera and other diseases,” said NIH Director Elias A. Zerhouni, MD. The investigators used the same liposome-based technique to develop a polyvalent inhibitor of cholera toxin, which also worked well in test-tube experiments, the NIH said. As explained in the NIH release, the toxin produced by Bacillus anthracis has three parts: a protein called protective antigen (PA), which binds to receptors on target cell surfaces, and two enzymes. When PA binds to a host cell, it creates a pore that enables the enzymes to enter the cell. Apr 25, 2006 (CIDRAP News) – Scientists have come up with a new approach to neutralizing the toxin produced by anthrax bacteria and have tested it successfully in a small number of animals, according to a report published this week. The antitoxin was also tested in rats. When nine rats were simultaneously injected with anthrax toxin and relatively small doses of the new antitoxin, five of them remained healthy. When slightly higher doses of the inhibitor were used, eight of nine rats were protected. The journal article says the experiment was the first to show that a liposome-based polyvalent inhibitor works in animals. The team next plans to infect animals with B anthracis and allow the disease process to begin before treating them with the anthrax antitoxin, the agency said.last_img read more

Over 160 rights groups call on IOC chief to revoke 2022 Beijing Winter Games

first_imgLast month, prominent Uighur rights group World Uighur Congress launched a similar appeal to the IOC over what it said were crimes against humanity in Xinjiang.The IOC responded that would remain neutral on political issues and said it had received assurances from Chinese authorities that they would respect the principles of the Olympic charter.The IOC did not immediately respond to a request for comment on Wednesday.China has already made extensive preparations for the upcoming Games, which they say are on track to be held from Feb. 4-20, 2022.There was similar outcry from rights groups ahead of the 2008 Beijing Olympics. At the time, the IOC defended the choice, saying the Games were a force for good.  Over 160 human rights advocacy groups have delivered a joint letter to the chief of the International Olympic Committee (IOC) calling for it to reconsider its choice to award China the 2022 Winter Games in light of Beijing’s human rights record.It is the largest such coordinated effort so far following several months of similar calls from individual rights groups, and comes as Beijing is facing increased international backlash over policies including its treatment of ethnic Uighurs in Xinjiang and new security laws in Hong Kong.”The IOC must recognize that the Olympic spirit and the reputation of the Olympic Games will suffer further damage if the worsening human rights crisis, across all areas under China’s control, is simply ignored,” said the letter, which was released on Tuesday. The letter argues that the prestige of the Beijing 2008 Olympics emboldened the government to take further actions, including programs targeting Xinjiang Uighurs and other ethnic policies.China’s Foreign Ministry did not immediately respond to a request for comment on the letter, but has on many occasions fiercely defended its rights record.It maintains policies in Xinjiang, Tibet and Hong Kong are key to national security and social stability.Among the letter’s signatories are Uighur, Tibetan, Hong Kong and Mongolian rights groups based in Asia, Europe, North America, Africa and Australia.center_img Topics :last_img read more