Patentia man fined $20,000 for Boxing Day chopping over stolen bird

first_imgMistaken identity?– to pay $80,000 compensation to victimFor actions that were based on hearsay, 48-year-old Ian Dorris, a Route 40 (Kitty-Campbellville) minibus driver, shop owner and resident of Patentia, West Bank Demerara, found himself on Thursday arraigned before Wales Magistrate Annette Singh.Gansarran SamarooHe admitted to having unlawfully and maliciously wounded Gansarran Samaroo on December 26, 2017 because he assumed that Samaroo had stolen his bird from his premises.Samaroo appeared in court limping, and with stiches to stab wounds inflicted to both his foot and upper body.According to the Police Prosecutor’s facts, Dorris had his pet under his house when Samaroo, who also resides in Patentia, purchased liquor from his shop and left.Dorris subsequently discovered that his bird was missing, and made checks about the neighbourhood. Magistrate Singh was told that the accused made several enquiries from neighbours, who affirmed that it was the VC who had carried out the act.The court heard that Dorris searched for, and contacted, Samaroo, then questioned him about the missing bird. Dorris then armed himself with a cutlass and dealt the victim several shops about the body before he took him to the Wales Police Station.At the station, ranks observed the man’s injuries and took him to West Demerara Regional Hospital (WDRH), where he was treated and sent away with a medical certificate. Police then cautioned Dorris and took him into custody for the offence.After Dorris had agreed with the Prosecution’s facts, Magistrate Singh highlighted that the defendant should have carried Samaroo to the station before injuring him.Ever remorseful, the accused said he had given the victim all the assistance that was required, but Samaroo was refusing his initial offer of $60,000 compensation and was demanding $120,000. The two parties eventually agreed on $80,000, and half of that amount was paid on Thursday.The Magistrate gave the defendant until next Thursday to pay the remaining $40,000. If he does not honour his obligation, he will spend three months in jail. Dorris was also fined $20,000.Samaroo went out of court limping just as he had entered. He was not charged for larceny, and Guyana Times was told that it could have been someone else who had stolen Dorris’s bird. (Shemuel Fanfair)last_img read more

Did Several Moons Collide to Make Saturn’s Titan?

first_imgDENVER—“The Origin of Titan—So Big … So Alone.” That was the playful title of a talk given here yesterday at the annual meeting of the Division for Planetary Sciences. The gist? Saturn’s relatively huge moon Titan, which orbits unaccompanied by the usual retinue of similar-sized moons, started out as three or four standard-issue satellites of the ringed planet that ran amok, collided, and merged into one huge moon and a few scraps of debris.Titan is “arguably the solar system’s most unusual satellite,” said the speaker, planetary dynamicist Douglas Hamilton of the University of Maryland, College Park. That’s because the standard model for producing satellites starts with a flat disk of primordial debris that eventually agglomerates into a regular system of several similar-size moons in roughly equally spaced orbits. This works fine for forming the nicely regular Jupiter satellite system, but Saturn’s is anything but regular. Titan is dominatingly big, having almost twice the mass of Earth’s moon and comprising 90% of the mass in orbit about Saturn. Titan is alone, orbiting in a million-kilometer gap bounded by tiny moons. And Titan’s orbit is odd: It is slightly elliptical rather than nearly circular and is tilted with respect to Saturn’s equator. With all those oddities, Hamilton said, “the biggest mystery is how it came to be in the first place.”Hamilton suggested a solution to Titan’s mysterious origin in which the standard model started out fine at Saturn but later things went awry. Three or four regular satellites could have formed and started to drift outward under the influence of tides raised on the moons by Saturn’s gravitational pull, the same way Earth’s moon has been slowly drifting outward since it formed. But rather than slipping into a stable arrangement the way Jupiter’s four moons did, in Hamilton’s scenario the orbits of Saturn’s initial moons became unstable and began to overlap and then the moons collided with one another. The collisions were relatively slow because the moons were all going in much the same direction, so the moons tended to merge rather than splatter as they hit.Sign up for our daily newsletterGet more great content like this delivered right to you!Country *AfghanistanAland IslandsAlbaniaAlgeriaAndorraAngolaAnguillaAntarcticaAntigua and BarbudaArgentinaArmeniaArubaAustraliaAustriaAzerbaijanBahamasBahrainBangladeshBarbadosBelarusBelgiumBelizeBeninBermudaBhutanBolivia, Plurinational State ofBonaire, Sint Eustatius and SabaBosnia and HerzegovinaBotswanaBouvet IslandBrazilBritish Indian Ocean TerritoryBrunei DarussalamBulgariaBurkina FasoBurundiCambodiaCameroonCanadaCape VerdeCayman IslandsCentral African RepublicChadChileChinaChristmas IslandCocos (Keeling) IslandsColombiaComorosCongoCongo, The Democratic Republic of theCook IslandsCosta RicaCote D’IvoireCroatiaCubaCuraçaoCyprusCzech RepublicDenmarkDjiboutiDominicaDominican RepublicEcuadorEgyptEl SalvadorEquatorial GuineaEritreaEstoniaEthiopiaFalkland Islands (Malvinas)Faroe IslandsFijiFinlandFranceFrench GuianaFrench PolynesiaFrench Southern TerritoriesGabonGambiaGeorgiaGermanyGhanaGibraltarGreeceGreenlandGrenadaGuadeloupeGuatemalaGuernseyGuineaGuinea-BissauGuyanaHaitiHeard Island and Mcdonald IslandsHoly See (Vatican City State)HondurasHong KongHungaryIcelandIndiaIndonesiaIran, Islamic Republic ofIraqIrelandIsle of ManIsraelItalyJamaicaJapanJerseyJordanKazakhstanKenyaKiribatiKorea, Democratic People’s Republic ofKorea, Republic ofKuwaitKyrgyzstanLao People’s Democratic RepublicLatviaLebanonLesothoLiberiaLibyan Arab JamahiriyaLiechtensteinLithuaniaLuxembourgMacaoMacedonia, The Former Yugoslav Republic ofMadagascarMalawiMalaysiaMaldivesMaliMaltaMartiniqueMauritaniaMauritiusMayotteMexicoMoldova, Republic ofMonacoMongoliaMontenegroMontserratMoroccoMozambiqueMyanmarNamibiaNauruNepalNetherlandsNew CaledoniaNew ZealandNicaraguaNigerNigeriaNiueNorfolk IslandNorwayOmanPakistanPalestinianPanamaPapua New GuineaParaguayPeruPhilippinesPitcairnPolandPortugalQatarReunionRomaniaRussian FederationRWANDASaint Barthélemy Saint Helena, Ascension and Tristan da CunhaSaint Kitts and NevisSaint LuciaSaint Martin (French part)Saint Pierre and MiquelonSaint Vincent and the GrenadinesSamoaSan MarinoSao Tome and PrincipeSaudi ArabiaSenegalSerbiaSeychellesSierra LeoneSingaporeSint Maarten (Dutch part)SlovakiaSloveniaSolomon IslandsSomaliaSouth AfricaSouth Georgia and the South Sandwich IslandsSouth SudanSpainSri LankaSudanSurinameSvalbard and Jan MayenSwazilandSwedenSwitzerlandSyrian Arab RepublicTaiwanTajikistanTanzania, United Republic ofThailandTimor-LesteTogoTokelauTongaTrinidad and TobagoTunisiaTurkeyTurkmenistanTurks and Caicos IslandsTuvaluUgandaUkraineUnited Arab EmiratesUnited KingdomUnited StatesUruguayUzbekistanVanuatuVenezuela, Bolivarian Republic ofVietnamVirgin Islands, BritishWallis and FutunaWestern SaharaYemenZambiaZimbabweI also wish to receive emails from AAAS/Science and Science advertisers, including information on products, services and special offers which may include but are not limited to news, careers information & upcoming events.Required fields are included by an asterisk(*)The end result: one big moon alone in an orbital space once occupied by several smaller moons. Hamilton’s computer simulations suggest that the collisions would have left Titan with a bit of orbital tilt and elongation, as observed. And little Hyperion, an ice chunk orbiting beyond Titan with even more tilt and elongation, could be a splatter from one of the collisions.“It’s very plausible,” says planetary physicist William McKinnon of Washington University in St. Louis, but he cautions that “it’s early days” for judging the new scenario. Among other things, he says, researchers need to check whether Hamilton’s tidal mechanism for driving the initial moons into unstable orbits would have worked so far from Saturn so long after they formed. And even Hamilton acknowledges he’s not sure how he would “prove” that he is right.McKinnon has one idea: If the Cassini spacecraft orbiting Saturn could pin down the nature of Titan’s interior, researchers would know whether it formed hot in violent collisions—which would have produced a rocky core—or it formed cold through the quiet agglomeration of primordial debris. But to gather the necessary evidence, a cash-strapped NASA would have to continue to fund Cassini for several more years.last_img read more