Commemorating the International Day for Tolerance

first_imgOn November 16th the world community observed the 19th International Day for Tolerance. While we are reminded of the security and human rights implications of intolerance which also take the form of stigma and discrimination.  This day also provides an opportunity to highlight the vital contribution of tolerance and acceptance to achieving important public health objectives and impact, especially focusing on groups living on the margins of many societies, including those communities currently in the grips of the Ebola virus in West Africa.The U.S. Government is proud to partner with the people and government of Liberia to implement President Barack Obama’s ‘whole of government’ approach to fight the Ebola virus in West Africa. The United States has been engaged in fighting the Ebola outbreak since the first cases were reported in March and has since deployed almost 2250 U.S. government personnel to West Africa, making this the largest-ever U.S. government response to a global health crisis.Thus far our efforts have helped increase the number of Ebola treatment units (ETU) in the region, increased the number of safe burial teams to 65, which are now working across every county in Liberia to safely and respectfully remove and bury bodies and we have expanded the pipeline of medical equipment and supplies in the region, airlifting more than 250 tons of personal protective equipment, infrared thermometers and chlorine. The United States has deployed and commenced operation of mobile Ebola testing labs in Liberia, reducing the time needed to determine if a patient has Ebola from several days to just a few hours.  Additionally, the Monrovia Medical Unit (MMU) this week received the first two health care workers who are infected with the Ebola virus, both Liberian.But while the whole of the United States Government is working with the Government of Liberia and many other partners to contain the threat of Ebola, the tolerance that Liberians extend to each other will be critical to continued success in diagnosing, containing, and treating Ebola patients, and moving Liberia towards a post-Ebola era.Tolerance requires treating everyone, even those who are different, with dignity and respect. In the case of Ebola, this challenge will be a global one.   Tolerance is needed for Ebola survivors, as well as health care workers treating Ebola patients and members of burial teams, many of whom have been ostracized by their families and communities. Countries whose citizens have so generously donated their time and talent working as clinicians, medical volunteers, engineers and aid workers, must work to combat the view that these healthy individuals are tainted for simply having worked in proximity, or even visited a nation touched by Ebola.Let us reaffirm that all individuals, whether they are Ebola patients, survivors, clinicians, lab specialists, nurses, doctors, burial teams, family members or aid workers should be free from the stigma that this, or any other disease, might carry with it, and instead should be treated with dignity and respect.I call on all our partners in the shared mission to fight the spread of the Ebola virus in Liberia to practice tolerance in all aspects of service delivery.  The goal of an Ebola-free Liberia will remain unfulfilled until every Liberian feels that he or she will be treated with tolerance and respect when seeking services to preserve his/her health if already infected, to protect themselves from becoming infected or to provide assistance and care to those seeking treatment.Join me in urging everyone to practice tolerance and respect of others not just to mark the International Day of Tolerance but every day of the year so that we may work together for the goal we all hope for:  a post-Ebola Liberia that is prosperous, vibrant and healthy.Share this:Click to share on Twitter (Opens in new window)Click to share on Facebook (Opens in new window)last_img read more

March 6 2000 After a winter drought the daily pr

first_imgMarch 6, 2000After a winter drought, the daily progress today is that it is raining! Joy, tothe rain! Allen, who cooks in theArcosanti Cafe , stands beside a water harvesting vessel. Photo by: DoctressNeutopialast_img

YouTube has recorded a large increase in the numbe

first_imgYouTube has recorded a large increase in the number of viewers to the RBS 6 Nations rugby tournament channel since the start of the 2014 championship.According to RBS 6 Nations, views of videos on the channel to date number 3.79 million, with over 60,000 subscribers.The numbers represent a solid increase on 2013. From February 3-9 this year, the channel recorded 558,228 views, compared to about 405,000 views for the comparable period last year.The channel airs video highlights of all matches in the competition.“We are delighted with the popularity of the channel to date this season and very pleased we have seen an increased viewership in comparison to 2013,” said RBS 6 Nations Chief Executive John Feehan.“The partnership with YouTube is a great addition to our digital plans and we will continue to bolster the channel with excellent footage, both on and off the pitch, for the remainder of the Championship.”last_img read more

Catalin Itu Liberty Globals central European sate

first_imgCatalin ItuLiberty Global’s central European satellite TV arm, UPC DTH, has named Catalin Itu as its new managing director.Itu takes over from Michael Lee, who is leaving the company. Lee has served as chief executive of UPC DTH since 2013.Itu, who is currently vice-president of sales and operations at UPC DTH, will take up his new post on October 1. He previously held positions in Orange Romania, Bosch Communications Romania and Astral Telecom.“I am very happy we are able to appoint Catalin to this role, he has extensive experience in DTH business and am looking forward to have him lead the next phase of growth of our DTH business across the CEE region. I would like to thank Michael for his long-term leadership and contribution to the Group and to wish him all the best for the future,” said Severina Pascu, CEO of UPC Central & Eastern Europe.last_img read more