Confidence in Queensland’s property sector falls for first time in nearly 2 years

first_imgProperty Council executive director Chris Mountford among development in West End. Pic Jono Searle.CONFIDENCE in Queensland’s property market has fallen for the first time in nearly two years on the back of the latest tax grab proposed by the state government.The ANZ/Property Council Survey released today, taken in the weeks either side of the November state election, has recorded a drop of two index points for Queensland in the March 2018 quarter — the first decline in 20 months.The state now has the lowest confidence levels of all Australian jurisdictions.The re-elected Palaszczuk Government has announced plans to increase land tax rates by 2.5 per cent on properties worth more than $10 million and more than double the tax rate for foreign investors from 3 to 7 per cent.GET THE LATEST REAL ESTATE NEWS DIRECT TO YOUR INBOX HEREProperty Council Queensland executive director Chris Mountford said the results confirmed industry concern about the proposed property tax hikes, which he argued would hurt jobs growth and home values.“At a time when we need to do more to catch up with other markets, increasing taxes on property is a big economic risk,” Mr Mountford said.“The impact of these proposed tax increases can already be seen in the figures.“Forward work schedules, staffing level expectations, and Queensland’s economic growth predictions are all down.”The ANZ/Property Council Survey Queensland results for the March quarter of 2018.The Property Council is urging the Government to reverse the proposed tax increases, saying ordinary Queenslanders would pay the price because businesses would be forced to pass on the cost to consumers.“The proposed land tax hike is ultimately going to flow through to affect capital values, and impose higher rents and costs on businesses,” he said.“I think there’s a general lack of understanding that foreign buyers are a key ingredient to getting new housing construction starts going.“If we’re making it harder for those people to invest in Queensland, ultimately that’s going to flow through to lower levels of activity.”The latest ANZ/Property Council Survey shows a drop in confidence in the Queensland property industry. Photo: Glenn Hunt/Getty Images.For the last two years, Queensland has consistently lagged behind the major states when it comes to confidence, only remaining in front of Western Australia, where the end of the resources boom created significant economic challenges.More from newsParks and wildlife the new lust-haves post coronavirus22 hours agoNoosa’s best beachfront penthouse is about to hit the market22 hours agoBut the latest survey shows a surge in confidence in WA.“Clearly confidence is starting to return to the WA market,” Mr Mountford said.“They’ve turned a corner and yet we haven’t had that sentiment shift.“If anything, we’re still bumbling along behind the other states.”New homes under construction in Mango Hill, north of Brisbane. The latest ANZ/Property Council Survey shows a drop in confidence in the Queensland property industry. Image: AAP/Dan Peled.But ANZ senior economist Daniel Gradwell said that he was not too concerned about the confidence drop in Queensland during the quarter,“Overall sentiment is still sitting at pretty solid levels, even though it has dropped off recently,” Mr Gradwell said.LAP UP LAKESIDE LUXURY“I think it’s fair to say Queensland has essentially moved past its mining-related downturn.“We’re starting to see economic activity improve, particularly across the labour market with unemployment at its lowest level in about four years.“So confidence is already translating into actual economic activity.”The latest ANZ/Property Council Survey shows a drop in confidence in the Queensland property industry. Photo: Glenn Hunt/Getty Images.St George Economics noted in its latest economic outlook for Queensland that the state’s economic growth had picked up over the past year, with business investment gaining momentum, commercial construction strengthening and robust employment growth.HOME BUYERS SKIP CRUCIAL CHECKSNationally, the survey reveals New South Wales has lost its throne to Victoria as the property industry with the strongest outlook.It gathered responses from 1374 professionals within the residential and commercial property sector.“It’s a large sample size, so we’re confident it’s reflective of what’s actually happening on the ground,” Mr Gradwell said.last_img read more

Detransitioners: Girls who became boys who want to be girls again

first_imgStuff co.nz 19 November 2019Family First Comment: There is plenty of help available for people who want to transition – but precious little for those who then change their minds. There is so little acknowledgement that not everyone who transitions remains aligned with the opposite sex that Keira cannot easily undo her gender recognition certificate, which leaves her as legally male; she would have to apply for another one to transition back to her birth sex. “There’s a lack of interest in detransitioner studies and outcomes and data, because it doesn’t really suit the people pushing this ideology to know about the bad outcomes.”Keira attended the Gender Identity Development Service at London’s Tavistock and Portman Trust, the only NHS facility for transgender young people.She says that when she was 16, after just three appointments, she was referred to an endocrinologist for puberty-blockers. Prescribed to “press pause” on puberty for children distressed by their developing bodies, the hormones do, however, carry health risks, including to bone density and cognitive development.For Keira, who had already started puberty, the effect was to halt future development and stop her periods. She then moved on to cross-sex hormones – testosterone for women transitioning, oestrogen for males – and appointments at the adult clinic at Charing Cross Hospital in London.Her voice deepened, she developed body hair and grew a beard. At the age of 21, she had her breasts removed. After realising her mistake, Keira had her last testosterone injection at the start of this year – yet she is still having to shave and is routinely mistaken for a man.It is not just a permanently lowered voice that is the legacy of Keira’s foray into gender reassignment, however. “I am so angry and I can’t see that going away,” she says. “Nothing was explored that may have better explained the way I felt about myself than that it must have meant I was born in the wrong body.”She describes an unhappy childhood, deeply affected by her parents’ divorce and her mother’s alcoholism, leading her to retreat into a world where being a boy felt like it offered escape.Now, she says, “I feel sick, I feel like I’ve been lied to. There’s no evidence for the treatments I’ve had, and they didn’t make me feel any better. It was maturity that did that.”Her view is echoed by Sue Evans, a psychoanalyst who used to work at the Tavistock and is now crowdfunding to bring a test case against the trust to establish that children cannot give their informed consent to what she describes as radical, experimental treatment.Evans will be speaking about her case at the Detransition Advocacy Network’s first event in Manchester at the end of the month. However, there is as yet no data on the number of people unhappy in their new gender, or those who are seeking to detransition.“I’m about the science, the research and evidence-based good practice in medicine,” says Evans. “And it just doesn’t exist when it comes to how we treat trans patients.“This has been moved out of the medical domain and has become political and ideological,” she adds. “But the problem is it absolutely is a medical issue, because you’re about to launch people on a pathway that chemically and medically interferes with the basis of their body, who they are and their identity.”There is plenty of help available for people who want to transition – but precious little for those who then change their minds.There is so little acknowledgement that not everyone who transitions remains aligned with the opposite sex that Keira cannot easily undo her gender recognition certificate, which leaves her as legally male; she would have to apply for another one to transition back to her birth sex.“There’s a lack of interest in detransitioner studies and outcomes and data, because it doesn’t really suit the people pushing this ideology to know about the bad outcomes,” says Evans.“Part of the trans message is, you’re the consumer, you make a choice about your gender and we will curate a body for you to fit in with your requirements,” she continues. “Detransitioners are the rejects who go into the seconds shop. They’re not the good examples from the production line of bodies that transition. In a sense, they’re the damaged goods no one wants to acknowledge.”READ MORE: https://www.stuff.co.nz/life-style/117553613/detransitioners-girls-who-became-boys-who-want-to-be-girls-again?fbclid=IwAR0hJua3FsJaxcmyGN3S-w4MLWKY7EG5k_FoVSExvIeVtwJJz3nkL2X-mEMlast_img read more

Malachi Richardson bounces back after rocky 9-game stretch from behind the arc

first_img Facebook Twitter Google+ Richardson had his first bad game of the season against Elon on Nov. 21. He said afterward that he compensated by attacking the rim. When Syracuse defeated then-No. 18 Connecticut in November, Richardson said he’d played his “worst brand of basketball” by going 1-of-4 from the field, turning it over twice and committing three fouls in the first half. When he made none of his 11 attempts against St. John’s less than a month later, he said to reporters after the game that he knew shots would eventually fall.He’s owned up to his freshman season struggles every time they’ve manifested themselves. But with Syracuse hanging on by a thread against the nation’s current No. 5 (UNC) and No. 8 (Miami) teams, it’s largely been due to Richardson’s renaissance. When Gbinije shot 0-of-7 from 3 against Miami, Richardson shot 5-of-6. When Gbinije again scored just 10 points against the Tar Heels, 16 from Richardson proved to be clutch.It hasn’t been enough to beat the best teams, but it’s enough to make a statement.“We don’t look at Mali as a freshman now,” Trevor Cooney said. “He’s played enough minutes in enough big games. We have the trust in him and the faith in him to go out there and make plays. We believe that he can do it and he’s done it.” Comments Logan Reidsma | Staff Photographer Published on January 12, 2016 at 7:17 pm Contact Sam: sblum@syr.edu | @SamBlum3center_img Related Stories The best game of Malachi Richardson’s career was painfully incompleteMalachi Richardson pours in career-high 20 points against MiamiMalachi Richardson struggles in 1st half, thrives in 2nd as SU beats No. 18 UConnMalachi Richardson struggles from field against Elon but finds other ways to score Malachi Richardson cut across the baseline, curled around a Tyler Lydon off-ball screen and caught a pass. Richardson reset the offense out toward halfcourt along the sideline.Then, with 4:45 left and Syracuse facing a four-point deficit, Richardson powered through the teeth of North Carolina’s defense, switching hands with the ball and laying in a basket to cut that UNC lead in half.Richardson’s second-half scoring on Saturday had a knack for the dramatic. His first shot was a long, uncontested 3-pointer to end an 8-5 Tar Heels run that started the half. His second cut a three-point lead to one. And his final bucket gave the Orange a last-gasp chance at a comeback against the No. 6 team in the country.“I’m a confident kid and I believe in what I do,” Richardson said. “I’m always going to play hard no matter what. Whether the ball is going in the basket or not. I work hard. I know I can do it. That’s where my confidence comes from.”Before Syracuse played Miami on Jan. 2, Richardson hit a cold stretch in which he made 10-of-57 from behind the arc over a nine-game span. In the three games since, all against Atlantic Coast Conference competition, Richardson has made 15 of his 27 attempts from long range. As point guard Michael Gbinije struggled and consistency on offense was tough to find from others, Richardson experienced a breakout for the free-falling Orange (10-7, 0-4 ACC).AdvertisementThis is placeholder textThe freshman, who had a career high in assists (five) on Saturday and a career high in rebounds (nine) the game before, will have a chance to continue to carry Syracuse on offense when it hosts Boston College (7-8, 0-2) on Wednesday in the Carrier Dome at 7 p.m.“He’s improved,” head coach Jim Boeheim said. “I think he’s become a better player and I think he still has a big upside. There’s still a lot of things that he can to get better. He’s having a tremendous year.”last_img read more