Commit to the Trip

first_imgA common occurrence in the active community is a little known ailment that goes by Insufficient Commitment Disorder. There are many brief spots in history where I have fallen victim to this pandemic. Someone will be riled up about a trip, hut-to-hut skiing perhaps or a biking afternoon at Carvins Cove, and I’ll be equally as excited and often times exclaim “that sounds awesome, count me in.” But as the adventure draws nearer, and excuses bubble to the top, somewhere in my head I know I’m not going to go on the trip.Everybody experiences this, the dissonance between “yes I’m going” and getting in the car. There are always many excuses readily available, but like elbows, everyone has them (and they don’t look that different from each other.)Maybe Insufficient Commitment Disorder can be looked at from a higher perspective. If I could live out all the lofty goals and expectations I have verbally committed to, I would be doing just fine for myself. Talk is cheap, and I love it, but action and movement are what will truly define your voice.Figuratively and literally easier said than done I’ve realize from experience. But now I think twice when asked to commit to the trip, think twice about the difference between “yes” and going, and realize that no matter what I say, it’s what I’ll do that will keep me moving.last_img read more

UPL Update

first_imgUPL Update October 15, 2003 Regular News The advisory opinion processcenter_img Jeffrey T. Picker Assistant UPL CounselI am often asked whether a certain activity constitutes the unlicensed practice of law. The answer to this question can be found primarily in case law. But what if there is no case law addressing the particular activity? This is where the formal advisory opinion process comes into play. The next few columns will discuss this process.Rule 10-9.1 of the Rules Regulating The Florida Bar sets forth the formal advisory opinion process in UPL matters. The rule requires that a written request for a formal opinion be submitted in the form of a hypothetical, providing all the relevant facts to the UPL Department, The Florida Bar, 651 E. Jefferson Street, Tallahassee 32399-2300. The question must not be the issue in a pending lawsuit and must ask whether the activity is the unlicensed practice of law.If the request complies with the above requirements, it will be placed on the agenda of the next meeting of the Standing Committee on Unlicensed Practice of Law. The standing committee usually meets three or four times per year. At the meeting the committee will decide whether to hold a public hearing on the request. In the past, the committee has voted to hold a public hearing in matters of first impression or of statewide importance.The next column will discuss what happens at the hearing and after.last_img read more