Security cameras help Salvadoran police fight street gangs MS-13 and Barrio 18

first_img The surveillance cameras will help security forces keep track of the criminal activities of the two largest gangs in El Salvador – Mara Salvatrucha, which is also known as MS-13, and Barrio 18, which is also known as 18th Street and M-18. Both of these gangs engage in killings, extortion, armed robbery, kidnapping, and micro-trafficking of drugs. Mara Salvatrucha and Barrio 18 have both formed alliances with international drug trafficking groups, such as the Sinaloa Cartel and Los Zetas, which operate in El Salvador and other parts of Central America. The gangs help drug cartels transport cocaine and other drugs north to Mexico, the United States, and other destinations. The Sinaloa Cartel and Los Zetas, two Mexican transnational criminal organizations, have expanded their operations in recent years in El Salvador, Guatemala, and Honduras. Monitoring MS-13 and Barrio 18 Training, coordination, and intelligence Technology is essential to the security forces of any nation, Aviles said. For example, London has used closed-circuit television cameras (CCTV) for years to monitor the streets of the city. The new cameras will be phased in, authorities said. The first phase began May 20, when authorities began installing 360 security cameras, which the National Civil Police (PNC) will use to monitor city streets for criminal activity, according to the Ministry of Security. Each surveillance camera can cover as much ground as 22 police officers on patrol, Jose Ricardo Perdomo, the minister of justice and public security, told reporters the day authorities began installing the devices. Authorities installed many of the cameras on streets that led into and out of San Salvador. “In the past, it was easier to point to specific areas that could be dangerous. Unfortunately, crime is spreading geographically,” Aviles said. “San Salvador is a sensitive area again.” The government plans on placing up to 6,500 cameras in the capital city and outlying areas. Images captured by the security cameras can be stored in a database for up to eight years. Authorities will be able to use images to monitor crimes as they occur, to identify potential criminal suspects and victims, and to check the registration of vehicle license numbers. Each camera has a range of about 800 meters. The ability of cameras to cover large amounts of territory will allow police who monitor the cameras to conduct “virtual patrols.” The cameras will send images to the PNC’s central command and control center. PNC authorities will monitor the images to respond to dispatch officers to crimes in progress and to gather intelligence. A pledge to fight crime Using technology to fight crimecenter_img On June 10, Minister of Justice and Security Benito Lara pledged the government is doing everything it can to fight crime and improve security.in every part of El Salvador. “Our policy is clear, we will develop everything in our power to combat crime. We will deploy more police officers in areas where gangs operate,” Lara said. The combination of improvements in technology and cooperation between the police and the residents of El Salvador should lead to improvements in public safety, Aviles said. “Any action to prevent insecurity and violence brings results,” he said. “In the near future the crime reduction is expected.” The security cameras are an important tool in the fight against crime, but they are part of a larger effort which involves improved training, intelligence gathering, and cooperation between citizens and the PNC, as well as between Salvadoran and U.S. security forces, according to Aviles. “Technology alone will not solve the problem of gangs or organizations of transnational organized crime,” Aviles said. “Technology needs to be accompanied by good training for all members of the security forces, equipment, weapons, vehicles, advanced communication, coordination and intelligence to successfully combat these criminal organizations.” Before they began installing large numbers of security cameras, authorities tested the surveillance system by installing a small number of the devices in San Salvador, according to the Ministry of Security. Those first cameras helped police capture a gang of car thieves, stop a drug transaction, and identify extortion suspects. Video and images from security cameras can be important tools in the fight against crime, Aviles said. Police and prosecutors can use video and photographic images from security cameras to identify criminals and bring them to justice. Video and photographic evidence can be crucial in criminal trials. The security camera system cost more than $5 million (USD), according to the Ministry of Justice and Public Safety. The camera surveillance system is equipped with the most sophisticated technology available and is protected against cyber-attacks. Salvadoran authorities are increasing their use of technology to fight crime. For example, authorities have blocked cellphone service at 10 prisons throughout the country to fight crime. Cellphones are prohibited inside prisons, but some incarcerated gang leaders have had friends or relatives smuggle the devices to them inside prison. The gang leaders have used the smuggled cellphones to direct the criminal activities of their gangs. Providing the best in technology is part of government’s broad strategy to fight gangs, international drug trafficking groups, and common criminals. In addition to the surveillance camera system, the government in recent years has provided the PNC an automated ballistics and fingerprint identification system, which helps police conduct criminal investigations. By Dialogo July 21, 2014 Salvadoran authorities plan to install more than 6,000 security cameras in the capital city of San Salvador and outlying areas in the coming months to improve public safety. The cameras will help security forces monitor and confront violence by gangs, transnational criminal organizations, and common criminals, according to Educational Foundation for the Prevention of Drug Abuse (FORESEE) executive director Carlos Aviles. “The use of video surveillance cameras will enhance the effectiveness of law enforcement against drug trafficking, extortion, kidnapping, common crime, theft and other emerging threats,” Aviles said. “It will strengthen (crime) prevention in San Salvador.” last_img read more

Rory McIlroy hopes hang on final major after turbulent season

first_imgAt the press conference to announce his multi-million pound deal with Nike in January, Rory McIlroy was keen to stress major titles mattered more to him than money. Such honesty made for great headlines, but is it great for McIlroy? “Sometimes (I wish I wasn’t so honest) but it’s just me,” he said. “I am not going to sit up here and pour my heart out but I will tell you how I am thinking and what’s on my mind. If I get asked a reasonable question I will give a reasonable answer.” The answer to McIlroy’s problems on the course may prove harder to find, but the Ryder Cup star is hoping a few enjoyable rounds with friends back home in Northern Ireland last week, coupled with the advice of putting coach Dave Stockton, will set him on the right track. He insists his game was in worse shape at this time last year before a fifth-place finish in Akron kickstarted a stunning second half of the season. And he believes competing at Firestone is the perfect preparation for what lies ahead at Oak Hill, venue for the 1995 Ryder Cup and the scene of Shaun Micheel’s US PGA triumph in 2003. “They are both old-fashioned, traditional golf courses,” McIlroy said. “The fairways at Oak Hill have a little more bend to them, you have to shape a lots of shots at Oak Hill; here a lot of them are straight out in front but the greens are similar, quite small and sloping and the par threes at both courses are strong holes. “I’ve heard the rough is up at Oak Hill from when I was there six weeks ago so I’m looking forward to seeing what that’s like.” “At the end of 2013, if I have not won another major I will be disappointed.” Two months after expressing those thoughts, McIlroy was replaced as world number one by Tiger Woods and now finds himself third in the rankings behind Phil Mickelson. And unless he retains his US PGA title next week at Oak Hill, that disappointment of not winning a major championship in 2013 will hit home too. The bookmakers have the 24-year-old from Northern Ireland as a 28/1 seventh favourite to lift the Wanamaker Trophy again and it is hard to argue with those odds. In fact it could easily be argued they are not generous enough. McIlroy won five times last year, including his second major by eight shots at Kiawah Island, to finish top of the money list on both sides of the Atlantic. But he has recorded only one top-five finish in a turbulent 2013 that saw him damage his reputation by walking off the course during his defence of the Honda Classic and bending one of his new clubs out of shape during the final round of the US Open. In the majors he has managed just one round under 70 – a closing 69 in the US Masters – and is a collective 28 over par after missing the cut in the Open Championship after rounds of 79 and 75. That opening round at Muirfield led McIlroy to offer a withering assessment of his own performance, labelling it “brain dead” and claiming he sometimes felt “like I’m walking around out there and I’m unconscious”. “I don’t play golf for the money, I am well past that,” McIlroy said in Abu Dhabi after signing a deal reported to be worth around £150million over 10 years. “I’m a major champion and world number one, which I have always dreamed of being, and feel this is a company that can help me sustain that and win even more major titles. Press Associationlast_img read more

Premier totally focused on League decider

first_imgTipp and Galway renew rivalries on Sunday when the sides clash in the National Hurling League final.Michael Ryan’s men are targeting their first league title since 2008.The sides last met in the All Ireland semi-final last year where Tipp won by a single point. Tipp’s Noel McGrath says the history between the sides will mean little on Sunday afternoon.Throw-in is at 3.30 on Sunday afternoon at the Gaelic Grounds in Limerick and the game will be live here on Tipp FM.last_img