Governor Wolf Announces Disaster Relief Funding Available for Philadelphia, Delaware County Farms

first_img Environment,  Human Services,  Press Release,  Public Health,  Weather Safety Harrisburg, PA – Governor Tom Wolf today notified farmland owners in Philadelphia and Delaware counties that they are eligible to receive disaster relief funding from the United States Department of Agriculture (USDA).“This year was unprecedented and unpredictable, with weather conditions that challenged farmers across the state,” said Governor Wolf. “This funding will be crucial to help those producers protect their investments and recoup some of their losses. I encourage anyone eligible in Philadelphia or Delaware counties to apply for this valuable federal relief.”The funding will help with losses caused by disasters that occurred during the 2018 crop year, such as excessive heat and drought. It is the result of a Secretarial disaster declaration and can include emergency loans from the federal Farm Service Agency (FSA).Eligible farmers can apply for loans for up to eight months after a Secretarial disaster declaration, and should contact their local FSA office for assistance. More information on USDA’s disaster assistance program, including county lists and maps, can be found at http://disaster.fsa.usda.gov. Governor Wolf Announces Disaster Relief Funding Available for Philadelphia, Delaware County Farms November 08, 2018center_img SHARE Email Facebook Twitterlast_img read more

Pension Protection Fund’s Alan Rubenstein joins Robeco

first_imgAlan Rubenstein, chief executive of the UK’s Pension Protection Fund, has joined the supervisory board of Robeco, according to the Dutch asset manager.Rubenstein, who joined the lifeboat scheme in 2009 after two years as head of Lehman Brothers’ Pensions Advisory Group, will chair Robeco’s investment committee and also sit on its audit and risk committee while retaining his role at the PPF.He has previously worked at Scottish Widows, BZW Asset Management and Lucas Varity Fund Management.He spent eight years at Morgan Stanley, working as its European head of pensions, before departing for Lehman Brothers two years before the bank collapsed. He was then hired in 2009 to replace Partha Dasgupta, the PPF’s second chief executive, but prior to his appointment also acted as vice-chairman of the National Association of Pension Funds, chairing the association’s investment council.In his time at the PPF, Rubenstein has put in place a plan for the lifeboat fund to be self-sufficient by 2030, worked with the NAPF to launch the Pensions Infrastructure Platform and is currently working on a new pensions insolvency model, replacing the current one based on Dun and Bradstreet scores.last_img read more

Silent but deadly: Freshman wing Johnson brings reserved personality to SU bench

first_imgShe seemed puzzled by the question. She said she misses her “sweetheart” dearly while he’s at school. When she first opened the door to the Melo Center, she said, “Where’s my son? Where’s my son?” And she loved going to every one of his games at Lower Merion High School in Pennsylvania. She knew all of that. But a more challenging question stumped her. His mother Sharon Dash watched intently from two feet to his right. Johnson’s aunt, uncle and cousin surrounded her. Dash listened as her son mentioned that he can’t swim, his favorite villain is the Joker and he loves any kind of rice. AdvertisementThis is placeholder text From his standard, squeaky-clean white, size 14 Jordans up to his No. 2 jersey and orange headband, everything was traditional. No Ron Patterson wacky hair. No DaJuan Coleman outlandish tattoos. No Jerami Grant irreversible grin. “At one point in time I thought you had to stick a pin in him to get him to wake up,” Bobby Johnson said. “He was always laid back, and I would always tell him, ‘When you come out on the floor, we don’t need that cool sh*t.’” But she couldn’t pinpoint anything that stood out about him. The banter continued. Dash and her sister Michelle Scott quipped about just how quiet Johnson is. “Noooo,” Dash responded, incredulously looking at her sister, taking a step back and jerking her head downward in disbelief. “I think he talks too much,” Scott said. Published on November 6, 2013 at 3:28 am Contact Trevor: tbhass@syr.edu | @TrevorHass “He’s just such a plain kid,” Dash said. “Baby, you’ve got to get interesting.” But Johnson’s father Bobby Johnson, who played professional basketball in Portugal and Germany, is the antithesis of quiet. When Bobby grew up in South Philadelphia, the culture was completely different. Jawing and trash talk was incessant. It was the expectation. You had to go out there and play and shut those people up, Bobby Johnson said. If you didn’t, you’d never come back on the floor again.Johnson and his father used to wake up at 6 a.m. and head to Lower Merion to work out for an hour. Johnson was dedicated throughout, Bobby said, but he didn’t always show enthusiasm on the court. B.J. Johnson stood firmly in place with his hands behind his back on the outskirts of the Carmelo K. Anthony Basketball Center gym during media day on Oct. 18. “I was being facetious,” Scott responded wryly. Facebook Twitter Google+ Then Johnson flashed a golden smile, revealing a slight gap between his two front teeth. He swayed back and forth, clearly uncomfortable by the entire situation. Johnson, who’s only 17, is as quiet as they come, according to his relatives. But his reserved nature and tendency to fly under the radar made him lethal in high school and may help him earn a spot in the Syracuse rotation. Comments He didn’t hear his son swear until he was 15 or 16.“I think the first time I actually heard him yell out the four-letter word he was playing at one of the practices and he was like ‘F*ck!’” Bobby Johnson said. “I was like, ‘OK, you do care.’”Before Lower Merion’s state championship game against Chester (Pa.) High School, Johnson and his father drove to the rehabilitation center because Johnson had sprained his ankle and needed treatment. Bobby tried to elicit some sort of enthusiasm out of his son — to make sure he was ready for the biggest game of his high school career.After losing to Chester three years in a row, Johnson and the Aces were out for revenge. But Johnson was calm, unfazed by the pressure of the situation.“I got ’em, dad,” he said coolly.“He got ’em!” Bobby said. Lower Merion beat Chester 63-47, ending the Clippers’ 78-game in-state winning streak. Johnson finished with 22 points and 11 rebounds. But the fire was never fully there. When Bobby Johnson first watched his son play at Lower Merion, he sat there wondering if the other fans would get riled up like he did.“When I first went to the games, the Lower Merion people are sitting there like it’s a cricket match,” Bobby said. “I remember being like, ‘What the — ain’t anybody going to get the guys going?’”Months later, removed from one of the most dominant stints at Lower Merion since Kobe Bryant’s hey-day, Johnson comes to SU as the No. 17 small forward in the class of 2013. Yet on media day, few reporters come his way. He stands far from the center of attention as reporters crowd around stars C.J. Fair and Grant. Most people don’t expect Johnson to play much this season. He may not. But his quiet confidence will help prepare him if he does. He’s not a blue-chipper, 5-star guy, Bobby said, but he works every day.“Sometimes it’s better to be that guy that comes in under the radar and just does what he needs to do,” Bobby said. “Then all of a sudden everybody’s saying, ‘I knew he would be that guy.’”Bobby Johnson recalls asking his son a question back in high school. “It was funny because I asked B.J., ‘Suppose this summer you really blew up and had Roy Williams knocking on your door. Would you want to go to North Carolina?“And he was like, ‘No.’“I said ‘If Coach K was knocking on your door, would you want to go to Duke?’“And he was like, ‘No.’“He had a plan, and it’s what he wanted to do.”Now Johnson’s ready to live out the dream he has had since seventh grade: star at Syracuse. Jim Boeheim said Johnson has surprised the coaching staff up to this point. He’s young, but he can ball. “I’m just really excited to be here and for the season to start,” Johnson said. “That’s pretty much all I’ve been waiting for and now it’s here.” “What’s the most fascinating thing about B.J.?” a reporter asked. last_img read more