Why mention race in Union College presidency?

first_imgCategories: Letters to the Editor, OpinionRe Feb. 21 article, “Union College introduces new leader”: Let’s stop with the firsts.Union College appoints a well-qualified and distinguished man as its next president and what is your lead take on it? “Dr. David Harris will be the first African-American …” Seriously?I think the picture would lead us to believe that he is black. How about leading with his job record, accomplishments, preparation? No, jump right to race. Not only is that divisive, but in a way cheapens his accomplishment. Was he the best candidate in the field (I would imagine he was) or was he the best black candidate?Martin Luther King Jr. wanted us to move to a place where a person is judged on the content of his character, not the color of his skin. You led with the latter when the former would have served everyone better.John MetalloSlingerlandsMore from The Daily Gazette:EDITORIAL: Find a way to get family members into nursing homesEDITORIAL: Beware of voter intimidationEDITORIAL: Urgent: Today is the last day to complete the censusAlbany County warns of COVID increaseFoss: Should main downtown branch of the Schenectady County Public Library reopen?last_img read more

Frances McIntosh, 95, of Moores Hil

first_imgFrances McIntosh, 95, of Moores Hill passed away Sunday, August 11, 2019, at Ripley Crossing in Milan.  Frances was born Tuesday, October 9, 1923, in Gray Hawk, Kentucky, the daughter of Henry and Matilda (Smith) Peters.  She married Edward McIntosh on March 31, 1939, and he preceded her in death on June 24, 1996.  She was a former member of Moores Hill Church of Christ.  She was the former owner/operator of McIntosh Grocery Store in Moores Hill and former member of Moores Hill Legion Auxiliary.  She enjoyed her flowers, gardening, bowling, bingo and was an avid Cincinnati Reds baseball fan.            Frances is survived by sons: James (Pat) McIntosh of Decorah, Iowa, Kenneth (Cheryl) McIntosh of Rising Sun and Deron McIntosh of Dillsboro; daughter Sandy Hollitt of Milan; daughter-in-law Connie McIntosh; 11 grandchildren; 18 great-grandchildren; 13 great-great-grandchildren and sister May Quinn of Louisville, Kentucky.  She was preceded in death by her parents, husband Edward, sons: Jerry and Ron, 1 brother, 1 sister, son-in-law Peter and 1 step-sister.            A service celebrating her life will be held 11 AM Thursday, August 15, 2019, at Sibbett-Moore Funeral Home in Moores Hill with Pastor Tom Holt officiating.  Burial will follow in Forest Hill Cemetery.  Family and friends may gather to share and remember her 5 – 7 PM Wednesday, August 14 also at the funeral home.  Memorials may be given in honor of Frances to Moores Hill Life Squad.  Sibbett-Moore Funeral Home entrusted with arrangements, 16717 Manchester Street, Box 156, Moores Hill, IN 47032 (812)744-3280.  You may go to www.sibbettmoore.com to leave an online condolence message for the family.last_img read more

I was in best of forms before Tokyo Paralympics was postponed — Powerlifter Ejike

first_imgRelatedPosts Italy introduces compulsory virus testing for travellers from France Nigeria records new COVID-19 infections, more deaths as figures rise to 57,242 COVID-19 vaccine will not be available before mid-2021 – German minister Powerlifting legend Lucy Ejike on Friday said she was physically fit and in top form before the postponed Tokyo 2020 Paralympic Games.Ejike told the News Agency of Nigeria in Abuja, following the long period of inactivity due to the coronavirus pandemic, that she was however yet to resume her gym sessions. The three-times Paralympics gold medalist said she has been training at home since the lockdown to keep fit.“I have been training at home since the lockdown and now that the lockdown is relaxed, I am still training at home and yet to resume gym sessions,” she said.Ejike however said she did not want to push herself into any vigorous training at the moment.She said: “I don’t want to do that because I have not been training consistently due to the COVID-19.“But I still know that this length of inactivity will not deter me. “In a few months time, I will get back to my peak.”The 42-year-old said she was at her best form before the lockdown in preparation for the postponed Tokyo 2020 Games.Ejike, who won a gold medal in the women’s up-to-61kg category at the World Para-Powerlifting World Cup in Abuja in February, said she was reserving her energy for the Tokyo Games.“That is where I am looking forward to breaking more records,” she said.The Paralympic Games earlier scheduled to begin in August 2020 has been postponed to August 2021 in Tokyo due to the COVID-19 pandemic. NAN.Tags: CoronavirusLucy EjikeTokyo Paralympicslast_img read more

Syracuse Athletics hires 2 new administrative members

first_img Published on November 18, 2016 at 7:06 pm Contact Matthew: mguti100@syr.edu | @MatthewGut21 Syracuse Athletics hired this week two members to its senior leadership team. Chris Fuller will join the staff as deputy athletics director of external operations and Kristen Jones Kolod will join as deputy athletics director and chief financial officer.Fuller will help manage marketing athletics tickets sales, communications and the Orange Club, SU’s primary fundraising arm. Jones Kolod will oversee SU Athletics’ financials, acting as the athletic department’s liaison with the university’s budget office.Fuller worked at Tennessee for 12 years, holding positions in sales, marketing and external operations. Since 2009, he has served as senior associate athletics director for external operations. Jones Kolod has served as SU’s executive director of budget and administrative operations in the Division of Enrollment and Student Experience, which formed this summer as a combination of the Division of Student Affairs and Enrollment Management.Fuller and Jones Kolod join Director of Athletics John Wildhack’s staff. Wildhack was hired in July after Mark Coyle stepped down from the director of athletics position. Comments AdvertisementThis is placeholder text Facebook Twitter Google+last_img read more

Jim Boeheim on the NIT’s experimental rules: ‘It makes no sense’

first_img Published on March 15, 2017 at 11:51 pm Contact Paul: pmschwed@syr.edu | @pschweds Facebook Twitter Google+ The second occurrence came with over 12 minutes left in the second half, when Lydon drew UNCG’s fifth foul of the 10-minute segment after grabbing a defensive rebound. He converted both free throws.With the Orange pulling away for most of the second half, the change in free-throw situations didn’t affect the outcome of the game. But as SU’s march toward the NIT crown continues it could be a factor down the line, a factor that Boeheim doesn’t like. Commentscenter_img Prior to Syracuse’s opening game in the National Invitation Tournament, head coach Jim Boeheim said he wasn’t sure what to expect from the tournament’s experimental rules.Boeheim and his staff mentioned the rules to the SU players, although they didn’t go into great detail before No. 1 seed SU’s (19-14, 10-8 Atlantic Coast) 90-77 win over No. 8 seed North Carolina-Greensboro (25-10, 14-4 Southern) on Wednesday night in the Carrier Dome in the first round of the NIT. After one game with the new rules, Boeheim came to his own conclusions.“I don’t know what it’s for, I don’t know where it came from or why,” Boeheim said referring to a rule that affects when teams shoot free throws. “It makes no sense.”The rule change was a shift in the resetting of team fouls from halftime to every 10 minutes of game time. When playing under the normal rule, each team is allowed six team fouls before the opposition shoots one-and-one free throws (meaning one shot is granted and if it’s made, the second one is earned) beginning with the seventh team foul in a half. Once 10 team fouls in a half are reached, the opposition earns two free throws with each foul.Under the experimental rules being used for the NIT, two free throws are granted once the opposition reaches four team fouls. But those team fouls reset after each of the four 10-minute segments in the game.AdvertisementThis is placeholder text“I don’t think the four-foul rule is a good rule at all,” Boeheim said. “Say you get (four), but you get the (fourth) one just after 10 (minutes into a half) and now they get (four) more, so you don’t get a free throw for 10 minutes.”Under the regular rules, Boeheim explained that once a team starts racking up fouls, it’s easier to earn free throws quicker rather than having to restart halfway through a half.“Now, it punishes you because now there’s no more free throws,” Boeheim said. “… You might get around four in eight or 10 minutes because they usually give a couple, the next couple and that seventh one usually comes, you get one-and-ones for six minutes. The way this works out, you might not get the two-shot foul possibly.”Sophomore forward Tyler Lydon said he thinks the rule is interesting. It helps teams get to the bonus quicker, he said, but defensively, forces players to avoid weak fouls away from the basket more than they already would.“Offensively it works out well for you. You get more shots, you can be more aggressive,” Lydon said, “but defensively it kind of makes you more hesitant to make plays because your team only has three fouls or whatever and a guy goes up and try to play it more straight or stop doing little ticky-tack fouls so I don’t know how much I really like it.”The rule came into play twice for the Orange on Wednesday night. With just under five minutes to play in the first half, Tyler Roberson grabbed a rebound and got fouled. It was the Spartans’ eighth team foul of the half, but instead of shooting a one-and-one, Roberson shot two. He missed both, but under the regular rules, the ball would have been live after the first miss.MORE COVERAGEGallery: Syracuse stiff-arms North Carolina-Greensboro, 90-77, in NIT openerWhat Syracuse players did during snowstorm StellaSyracuse fights off NCAA Tournament disappointment to beat UNC-Greensboro, 90-77, in NIT openerAssistant coach Gerry McNamara fueled Andrew White to break his single-season 3-point recordThe Final Word: Beat writers discuss takeaways from Syracuse’s 90-77 win over UNC-Greensborolast_img read more