What not to say when asking for a raise

first_img 21SHARESShareShareSharePrintMailGooglePinterestDiggRedditStumbleuponDeliciousBufferTumblr,Tyler Atwell Web: www.cuinsight.com Details “I’m leaving if I don’t get a raise”Never give an ultimatum. While it may seem like a good idea to show how serious you are, it won’t turn out well for you. If you do get the raise, chances are your relationship with your boss has taken a turn for the worse. And if it doesn’t work, you could be in a tough spot if you’re not prepared to follow through.“I am a harder worker than (Co-worker’s name)”You might know this to be true, but you should never bring this up in conversation, especially when asking for a raise. Never compare yourself to others. If it backfires, you may not be happy with what the response you get. Focus on what you have accomplished for the company and how your achievements warrant the bigger salary.“I haven’t had a raise since…”Stop right there. When you’re trying to convince someone to invest more money into you, the last thing you want to do is start by complaining. Not to mention, there may be a reason you haven’t had a raise lately. It doesn’t necessarily mean your work isn’t deserving of the compensation, but other factors like where the company is financially may be at play here. If your place of business isn’t currently turning a profit, more than likely they can’t afford to pay you more.“I need a raise because my expenses are high”It’s never a bad idea to keep your personal life and work life separated. Whatever expenses you are running into, planning to buy a house, medical or just living beyond your means, they are irrelevant to you getting a raise. Your boss may feel sympathetic, but beyond that all it does is make you look bad. You are asking for more money because of a perceived inability to plan with the money you currently make.last_img

Post A Comment

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *